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I need to draw a large amount of 2D elements in WPF, such as lines and polygons. Their position also needs to be updated constantly.

I have looked at many of the answers here which mostly suggested using DrawingVisual or overriding the OnRender function. To test these methods I've implemented a simple particle system rendering 10000 ellipses and I find that the drawing performance is still really terrible using both of these approaches. On my PC I can't get much above 5-10 frames a second. which is totally unacceptable when you consider that I easily draw 1/2 million particles smoothly using other technologies.

So my question is, am I running against a technical limitation here of WPF or am I missing something? Is there something else I can use? any suggestions welcome.

Here the code I tried

content of MainWindow.xaml:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="500" Width="500" Loaded="Window_Loaded">
    <Grid Name="xamlGrid">

    </Grid>
</Window>

content of MainWindow.xaml.cs:

using System.Windows.Threading;

namespace WpfApplication1
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }


        EllipseBounce[]     _particles;
        DispatcherTimer     _timer = new DispatcherTimer();

        private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {

            //particles with Ellipse Geometry
            _particles = new EllipseBounce[10000];

            //define area particles can bounce around in
            Rect stage = new Rect(0, 0, 500, 500);

            //seed particles with random velocity and position
            Random rand = new Random();

            //populate
            for (int i = 0; i < _particles.Length; i++)
            {
               Point pos = new Point((float)(rand.NextDouble() * stage.Width + stage.X), (float)(rand.NextDouble() * stage.Height + stage.Y));
               Point vel = new Point((float)(rand.NextDouble() * 5 - 2.5), (float)(rand.NextDouble() * 5 - 2.5));
                _particles[i] = new EllipseBounce(stage, pos, vel, 2);
            }

            //add to particle system - this will draw particles via onrender method
            ParticleSystem ps = new ParticleSystem(_particles);


            //at this element to the grid (assumes we have a Grid in xaml named 'xmalGrid'
            xamlGrid.Children.Add(ps);

            //set up and update function for the particle position
            _timer.Tick += _timer_Tick;
            _timer.Interval = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0, 0, 1000 / 60); //update at 60 fps
            _timer.Start();

        }

        void _timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < _particles.Length; i++)
            {
                _particles[i].Update();
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Framework elements that draws particles
    /// </summary>
    public class ParticleSystem : FrameworkElement
    {
        private DrawingGroup _drawingGroup;

        public ParticleSystem(EllipseBounce[] particles)
        {
            _drawingGroup = new DrawingGroup();

            for (int i = 0; i < particles.Length; i++)
            {
                EllipseGeometry eg = particles[i].EllipseGeometry;

                Brush col = Brushes.Black;
                col.Freeze();

                GeometryDrawing gd = new GeometryDrawing(col, null, eg);

                _drawingGroup.Children.Add(gd);
            }

        }


        protected override void OnRender(DrawingContext drawingContext)
        {
            base.OnRender(drawingContext);

            drawingContext.DrawDrawing(_drawingGroup);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// simple class that implements 2d particle movements that bounce from walls
    /// </summary>
    public class SimpleBounce2D
    {
        protected Point     _position;
        protected Point     _velocity;
        protected Rect     _stage;

        public SimpleBounce2D(Rect stage, Point pos,Point vel)
        {
            _stage = stage;

            _position = pos;
            _velocity = vel;
        }

        public double X
        {
            get
            {
                return _position.X;
            }
        }


        public double Y
        {
            get
            {
                return _position.Y;
            }
        }

        public virtual void Update()
        {
            UpdatePosition();
            BoundaryCheck();
        }

        private void UpdatePosition()
        {
            _position.X += _velocity.X;
            _position.Y += _velocity.Y;
        }

        private void BoundaryCheck()
        {
            if (_position.X > _stage.Width + _stage.X)
            {
                _velocity.X = -_velocity.X;
                _position.X = _stage.Width + _stage.X;
            }

            if (_position.X < _stage.X)
            {
                _velocity.X = -_velocity.X;
                _position.X = _stage.X;
            }

            if (_position.Y > _stage.Height + _stage.Y)
            {
                _velocity.Y = -_velocity.Y;
                _position.Y = _stage.Height + _stage.Y;
            }

            if (_position.Y < _stage.Y)
            {
                _velocity.Y = -_velocity.Y;
                _position.Y = _stage.Y;
            }
        }
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// extend simplebounce2d to add ellipse geometry and update position in the WPF construct
    /// </summary>
    public class EllipseBounce : SimpleBounce2D
    {
        protected EllipseGeometry _ellipse;

        public EllipseBounce(Rect stage,Point pos, Point vel, float radius)
            : base(stage, pos, vel)
        {
            _ellipse = new EllipseGeometry(pos, radius, radius);
        }

        public EllipseGeometry EllipseGeometry
        {
            get
            {
                return _ellipse;
            }
        }

        public override void Update()
        {
            base.Update();
            _ellipse.Center = _position;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
I was just doing some tests by overriding OnRender() and throwing in some 10000 random drawingContext.DrawLine(). I discovered it makes a HUGE difference in performance just by Freezing Freezables such as Pen and Brush. –  HighCore Apr 19 '13 at 15:49
    
ok, thanks will give that a try. apart from pen (which is null in my implementation) and Brush is there anything else that should be frozen? –  dr.mo Apr 19 '13 at 22:19
1  
unfortunately i can't get a noticeable change in performance when freezing Brush. my test particle renderer is still only running at around 5 frames a second, which is just way too slow. at this rate it would probably be faster to manually draw particles to bitmap on the CPU - i just don't understand how WPF can be this slow when it's build on DirectX –  dr.mo Apr 22 '13 at 14:43
    
Post some sample code... also have you looked at this? –  HighCore Apr 22 '13 at 14:56
1  
WPF is a retained mode system, overriding OnRender is, most of the time, not the way to go. Compose your scene and let it draw. You can check this out to draw a million polygons: blogs.msdn.com/b/kaelr/archive/2010/08/11/… it's using a "VirtualCanvas" –  Simon Mourier Apr 24 '13 at 8:37

4 Answers 4

I believe the sample code provided is pretty much as good as it gets, and is showcasing the limits of the framework. In my measurements I profiled an average cost of 15-25ms is attributed to render-overhead. In essence we speak here about just the modification of the centre (dependency-) property, which is quite expensive. I presume it is expensive because it propagates the changes to mil-core directly.

One important note is that the overhead cost is proportional to the amount of objects whose position are changed in the simulation. Rendering a large quantity of objects on itself is not an issue when a majority of objects are temporal coherent i.e. don't change positions.

The best alternative approach for this situation is to resort to D3DImage, which is an element for the Windows Presentation Foundation to present information rendered with DirectX. Generally spoken that approach should be effective, performance wise.

share|improve this answer
    
D3DImage - sounds promising, will look into it. thank you! –  dr.mo Apr 27 '13 at 8:51

You could try a WriteableBitmap, and produce the image using faster code on a background thread. However, the only thing you can do with it is copy bitmap data, so you either have to code your own primitive drawing routines, or (which might even work in your case) create a "stamp" image which you copy to everywhere your particles go...

share|improve this answer
    
yes absolutely. i bet using agg i could draw more particles on the CPU than with WPF on the GPU. however, i need the CPU for other stuff, and it just seems wrong when i know it's possible to do this very fast on the GPU. –  dr.mo Apr 29 '13 at 11:53

In windows forms these kind of things made me fall back to;

  • Set Visible=False for the highest level container (e.g. canvas of the form itself)
  • Draw a lot
  • Set Visible=True

Not sure if WPF supports this.

share|improve this answer

Here are some of the things you may try: (I tried them with your sample and it seems to look faster (at least on my system)).

  • Use Canvas instead of Grid (unless you have other reasons). Play BitmapScalingMode and CachingHint:

    <Canvas Name="xamlGrid" RenderOptions.BitmapScalingMode="LowQuality" RenderOptions.CachingHint="Cache" IsHitTestVisible = "False">
    
    </Canvas>
    
  • Add a StaticResource for Brush used in GeometryDrawing:

    <SolidColorBrush x:Key="MyBrush" Color="DarkBlue"/>
    

in code use as:

    GeometryDrawing gd = new GeometryDrawing((SolidColorBrush)this.FindResource("MyBrush"), null, eg);

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
-1. How will a casting thing improve performance?? also putting an already frozen freezable (Brushes.Black) as a StaticResource won't help. –  HighCore Apr 24 '13 at 20:51
    
@HighCore: Casting in general is to be avoided. However, in this case it is either as good or better than creating the brush for every item. I think you should test it before judging it! It would be better to use the StaticResource within a Style/template but that would involve changing the way he is creating the particles. –  FHnainia Apr 25 '13 at 14:01
3  
Sorry, not true. System.Windows.Media.Brushes.Black is a static instance, therefore when you reference it you are not "creating a new one each time", but actually using the same one. Which, by the way is already frozen. –  HighCore Apr 25 '13 at 15:03

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