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There's got to be a faster and better way to swap bytes of 16bit words then this.:

public static void Swap(byte[] data)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i += 2)
    {
        byte b = data[i];
        data[i] = data[i + 1];
        data[i + 1] = b;
    }
}

Does anyone have an idea?

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2  
Your solution seems like a good one except that IF YOUR DATA IS EVER BE ODD-LENGTHED, your code will throw array out of bound exception. –  NawaMan Oct 23 '09 at 0:53
1  
If he's swapping 16 bit words, then his data will never have odd length. –  Stephen Canon Oct 23 '09 at 0:59
    
Yes, this will be a private method and it will be guaranteed to have 16bit words. –  initialZero Oct 23 '09 at 1:02
    
Why are you looking for faster and better? Is there some metric you are aiming for? –  James Black Oct 23 '09 at 1:11
1  
this is an O(n) solution, with no new memory allocations. Other then declaring b outside the loop so it won't be allocated each time, why do you want to improve this? –  Amirshk Oct 23 '09 at 1:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
+250

In my attempt to apply for the Uberhacker award, I submit the following. For my testing, I used a Source array of 8192 bytes and called SwapX2 100,000 times:

public static unsafe void SwapX2(Byte[] Source)  
{  
    fixed (Byte* pSource = &Source[0])  
    {  
        Byte* bp = pSource;  
        Byte* bp_stop = bp + Source.Length;  

        while (bp < bp_stop)  
        {
            *(UInt16*)bp = (UInt16)(*bp << 8 | *(bp + 1));  
            bp += 2;  
        }  
    }  
}

My benchmarking indicates that this version is over 1.8 times faster than the code submitted in the original question.

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This way appears to be slightly faster than the method in the original question:

private static byte[] _temp = new byte[0];
public static void Swap(byte[] data)
{
    if (data.Length > _temp.Length)
    {
        _temp = new byte[data.Length];
    }
    Buffer.BlockCopy(data, 1, _temp, 0, data.Length - 1);
    for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i += 2)
    {
        _temp[i + 1] = data[i];
    }
    Buffer.BlockCopy(_temp, 0, data, 0, data.Length);
}

My benchmarking assumed that the method is called repeatedly, so that the resizing of the _temp array isn't a factor. This method relies on the fact that half of the byte-swapping can be done with the initial Buffer.BlockCopy(...) call (with the source position offset by 1).

Please benchmark this yourselves, in case I've completely lost my mind. In my tests, this method takes approximately 70% as long as the original method (which I modified to declare the byte b outside of the loop).

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Uberhacker award! I would expect a large resize of temp to be more expensive than an in place swap. And it's sorta a memory-leak just having temp sit around. –  initialZero Oct 23 '09 at 2:07
1  
@initialZero: in my benchmark, I initially sized it to the same size as my test array, so there was no cost there. Temp variables like this in general buy speed at the expense of memory, which may or may not be a good decision. –  MusiGenesis Oct 23 '09 at 2:12
    
@MusiGenesis you could always set temp = null at the end of swap to fix the leak. It's definitely a cool solution. Thanks. –  initialZero Oct 23 '09 at 2:17
    
No. No. The function can't be called from multiple threads. –  Feng Yuan Jul 25 '12 at 23:21
    
@FengYuan: not every method needs to be thread-safe; it entirely depends upon how it's being used. –  MusiGenesis Jul 26 '12 at 18:38

I always liked this:

public static Int64 SwapByteOrder(Int64 value) 
{
  var uvalue = (UInt64)value;
  UInt64 swapped = 
       ( (0x00000000000000FF) & (uvalue >> 56)
       | (0x000000000000FF00) & (uvalue >> 40)
       | (0x0000000000FF0000) & (uvalue >> 24)
       | (0x00000000FF000000) & (uvalue >> 8)
       | (0x000000FF00000000) & (uvalue << 8)
       | (0x0000FF0000000000) & (uvalue << 24)
       | (0x00FF000000000000) & (uvalue << 40)
       | (0xFF00000000000000) & (uvalue << 56));
  return (Int64)swapped;
}

I believe you'll find this is the fastest method as well a being fairly readable and safe. Obviously this applies to 64-bit values but the same technique could be used for 32- or 16-.

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You may like Jon Skeet's approach - MiscUtil\Conversion

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From a profiling perspective, Jon Skeet's approach is MUCH faster than either solution here. –  Matt Davis Jun 28 '11 at 3:58

Well, you could use the XOR swapping trick, to avoid an intermediate byte. It won't be any faster, though, and I wouldn't be surprised if the IL is exactly the same.

for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i += 2)
{
    data[i] ^= data[i + 1];
    data[i + 1] ^= data[i];
    data[i] ^= data[i + 1];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good one. But this is somewhat more confusing to read. And wikipedia claims "On modern (desktop) CPUs, the XOR technique is considerably slower than using a temporary variable to do swapping." Oh well. Thanks for the sexy solution. –  initialZero Oct 23 '09 at 1:23
    
Yeah, I think all we can say about it is that it's neat. I just benchmarked it, and got results identical to your solution. So, one of the forms is likely optimized to the other. –  Michael Petrotta Oct 23 '09 at 1:25

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