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A peculiar problem, given a list of lists (nested at most one level here):

[['a', 'b'], 'c', ['d', 'e'], ['f', 'g'], 'h']

..find all the lists of length the same as given list and containing all the possible combinations of elements from sublists, with exactly 1 element of a given sublist at the same position as original sublist (it's hard to even put this in words). That is, find this:

['a', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'e', 'g', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'e', 'g', 'h']

Now, I have found the solution, but it's not satisfactory for me:

def all_paths(s, acc=None, result=None):
    # not using usual "acc = acc or []" trick, because on the next recursive call "[] or []" would be
    # evaluated left to right and acc would point to SECOND [], which creates separate accumulator 
    # for each call stack frame
    if acc is None:
        acc = []
    if result is None:
        result = []
    head, tail = s[0], s[1:]
    acc_copy = acc[:]
    for el in head:
        acc = acc_copy[:]
        acc.append(el)
        if tail:
            all_paths(tail, acc=acc, result=result)
        else:
            result.append(acc)
    return result

As you can see, it involves copying accumulator list TWICE, for rather obvious reason that if .append() or .extend() method gets called down the recursion stack, accumulator would get modified since it is passed by label (sharing in official lingo?).

I tried to cook up solution that pop()s and append()s relevant number of items off accumulator, but can't get it right:

def all_p(s, acc=None, result=None, calldepth=0, seqlen=0):
    if acc is None:
        acc = []
    if result is None:
        seqlen = len(s)
        result = []
    head, tail = s[0], s[1:]
    for el in head:
        acc.append(el)
        if tail:
            all_p(tail, acc=acc, result=result, calldepth=calldepth+1, seqlen=seqlen)
        else:
            result.append(acc[:])
            print acc
            for i in xrange(1+seqlen-calldepth):
                acc.pop()
    return result

Result:

['a', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'g', 'h']

Obviously, this is because as depth-first recursion here jumps up and down the call chain and I can't get the number of pop()s right to finetune the accumulator list.

I do realize that this is of little practical gain as copying the list is O(n) while popping k items off a list is O(k), so there isn't all that much difference here, but I'm curious if this can be accomplished.

(Background: I'm redoing phonecode benchmark, http://page.mi.fu-berlin.de/prechelt/phonecode/, and this is the part that finds all the words, but each fraction of a phone number can map to several words, like so:

... '4824': ['fort', 'Torf'], '4021': ['fern'], '562': ['mir', 'Mix'] ...

so I need to find all the possible "paths" through a selected list of matching words and/or digits, corresponding to given phone number)

Questions, requests:

  1. can the version that does not copy accumulator be fixed?

  2. is there a solution to this that uses itertools module?

  3. any other, better approach to this particular problem? like non-recursive solution, faster solution, less memory-intensive one?

Yes I know this is a truckload of problems, but if somebody solves a non-empty subset of them I'd be grateful. :-)

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closed as off topic by g.d.d.c, kojiro, Peter O., Peter Ritchie, nickhar Apr 20 '13 at 2:16

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1  
This is a great question, but I feel like it'd belong at codereview.stackexchange.com more than here - you have a working solution, there's no problem to solve here. –  g.d.d.c Apr 19 '13 at 16:52
    
@g.d.d.c: in some way you're right although I phrased in the wrong way - what I really wanted to know if itertools might be used to solve this problem. I suspected it might and it turns out that Aya was able to produce such a solution. –  John Doe Apr 19 '13 at 21:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

is there a solution to this that uses itertools module?

Yes, and it's pretty simple with itertools.product(). This is sufficient for your specific example...

>>> import itertools
>>> l = [['a', 'b'], 'c', ['d', 'e'], ['f', 'g'], 'h']
>>> for i in itertools.product(*l): print list(i)
['a', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['a', 'c', 'e', 'g', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'd', 'f', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'd', 'g', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'e', 'f', 'h']
['b', 'c', 'e', 'g', 'h']

...but as DSM pointed out in the comments, it only works because your example uses one-character strings, which are sequence objects of length one. If this is always the case, you could express the list like this...

['ab', 'c', 'de', 'fg', 'h']

However, in the general case, you'd probably want to ensure all the list items are sequences with something like this...

>>> l = [None, int, 0, 'abc', [1, 2, 3], ('a', 'b')]
>>> for i in itertools.product(*[i if isinstance(i, (list, tuple)) else [i] for i in l]): print list(i)
[None, <type 'int'>, 0, 'abc', 1, 'a']
[None, <type 'int'>, 0, 'abc', 1, 'b']
[None, <type 'int'>, 0, 'abc', 2, 'a']
[None, <type 'int'>, 0, 'abc', 2, 'b']
[None, <type 'int'>, 0, 'abc', 3, 'a']
[None, <type 'int'>, 0, 'abc', 3, 'b']

any other, better approach to this particular problem? like non-recursive solution, faster solution, less memory-intensive one?

Any solution would probably have to use recursion in some way, if not on the stack, then on the heap.

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1  
Note that this may not give the expected results if, say, 'c' were 'counterexample', or if 'c' were 0 (in which case it wouldn't even run). –  DSM Apr 19 '13 at 17:22
    
@DSM Good point. Any comments on the updated answer? –  Aya Apr 19 '13 at 17:34
    
serves me right for not learning itertools I guess. one more reason to do it. –  John Doe Apr 19 '13 at 21:03

This is a less Pythonesque, but possibly unroll-able version:

def all_paths(l):
        if 1 == len(l):
                return [ l ]
        down = all_paths(l[1:])

        # We iterate only lists, not tuples, not strings
        if type(l[0]) in [ list ]:
                return [ [ ll ] + k for k in down for ll in l[0] ]
        return [ [ l[0] ] + k for k in down ]

l = [['a', 'b'], 'c', ['d', 'e'], ['f', 'g'], 'h']

for i in all_paths(l):
        print i

In this form, it is inferior in all respects to the itertools solution: twice the time, and more than four times the memory impact:

HEAP SUMMARY (itertools)
in use at exit: 1,867,521 bytes in 537 blocks
total heap usage: 12,904 allocs, 12,367 frees, 8,444,917 bytes allocated

HEAP SUMMARY (lists)
in use at exit: 1,853,779 bytes in 498 blocks
total heap usage: 57,653 allocs, 57,155 frees, 9,272,129 bytes allocated

Also unrolling the function - at least, in a quite naive way - is inferior to itertools (three times as slow), and twice the memory allocations:

HEAP SUMMARY:
in use at exit: 1,853,779 bytes in 498 blocks
total heap usage: 26,707 allocs, 26,209 frees, 8,812,153 bytes allocated


def all_paths(l):
        m   = len(l)-1
        val = [ i for i in range(0,m) ]
        ndx = [ 0 for i in l ]
        top = [ len(i) if type(i) in [list] else 0 for i in l ]
        while(True):
                path = [ l[i] if top[i] == 0 else l[i][ndx[i]] for i in val ]
                #print path
                n   = m
                ndx[n] = ndx[n] + 1
                while (ndx[n] >= top[n]):
                        ndx[n] = 0
                        n = n - 1
                        if (-1 == n):
                                return
                        ndx[n] = ndx[n] + 1

(using enumerate or type(l[i]) results in even worse performances).

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