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Two vectors:

A = ['1','2','3','4','5','6','','6','7','8','','1','2','3','','']
B = ['2','3','4','','5','','','6','','7','8','9','1','4']

How do I only plot A vs B for values which have two existing elements? At the moment, I have to loop over each vector and check int() is > 0 at the same row.

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3  
Please edit your post to include your attempt at a solution. Thank you. –  bernie Apr 19 '13 at 16:18
2  
That isn't valid python syntax --- you can't have multiple commas in a list definition. What's actually in those blanks? –  Pyrce Apr 19 '13 at 16:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use zip to pair the elements and then (if they're strings) all to select those which aren't the empty string, because bool(some_str) is False if it's empty and True otherwise. For example:

>>> A = ['1','2','3','4','5','6','','6','7','8','','1','2','3','','']
>>> B = ['2','3','4','','5','','','6','','7','8','9','1','4']
>>> pairs = filter(all, zip(A, B))
>>> pairs
[('1', '2'), ('2', '3'), ('3', '4'), ('5', '5'), ('6', '6'), ('8', '7'), ('1', '9'), ('2', '1'), ('3', '4')]

I'd probably use a list comprehension, though, something more like:

>>> [map(float, pair) for pair in zip(A, B) if all(pair)]
[[1.0, 2.0], [2.0, 3.0], [3.0, 4.0], [5.0, 5.0], [6.0, 6.0], [8.0, 7.0], [1.0, 9.0], [2.0, 1.0], [3.0, 4.0]]

and get numbers out at the same time.

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If you put None in the empty spaces then you can join the two vectors and remove the pairs with missing values like this:

>>> A = [1,2,3,4,5,6,None,6,7,8,None,1,2,3,None,None]
>>> B = [2,3,4,None,5,None,None,6,None,7, 8,9,1,4]
>>> filter(lambda (a,b): a is not None and b is not None, map(lambda a,b: (a,b), A,B))
[(1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 4), (5, 5), (6, 6), (8, 7), (1, 9), (2, 1), (3, 4)]

then you can use the result for plotting.

Answering your question in comments, if you use Python's CSV module then it will properly parse that CSV with empty spaces and parse the empty spaces as empty strings:

$ cat t.csv 
1,2,,4
1,,3,,
$ python
Python 2.7.1 (r271:86832, Mar 18 2011, 09:09:48) 
[GCC 4.5.0 20100604 [gcc-4_5-branch revision 160292]] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import csv
>>> with open('t.csv') as f:
...   reader = csv.reader(f)
...   for row in reader:
...     print row
... 
['1', '2', '', '4']
['1', '', '3', '', '']
>>> 
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Is there a way to put None in the empty areas? –  Griff Apr 19 '13 at 17:05
    
Where do you get the input data from? Is it a text file in the format you gave? –  piokuc Apr 19 '13 at 17:06
    
Yes it is a csv text file. –  Griff Apr 19 '13 at 17:09
    
See the updated answer –  piokuc Apr 19 '13 at 17:26

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