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I have seen a few different ways to instantiate objects in javascript, wanted to know the benefits/drawbacks of the various approaches and why you would use one over the other.

Approach 1

var obj = {
    prop: value,
    .
    .
    .
}

Approach one is standard approach, nothing new :)

Approach 2

var obj = new function() {
    var prop1 = value1;
    var fn1 = function() {
    };
    .
    .
    .

    this.prop2 = value2;
    .
    .
    .
}();

The function approach, I wanted to compare this approach with approach 3. The function approach is primarily used for encapsulation (correct?)

Approach 3

var obj = (function() {
    var prop1 = value1;
    var fn1 = function() {
    };
    .
    .
    .

    return {
        prop2: value2,
        .
        .
        .
    }
})();

With this approach, I do not quite see the reasoning behind its usage. How does it differ from approach 2? Both can be used to encapsulate logic.

Is it so we can pass in parameters, so we can deal with any potential conflicts?? E.g jquery's $ syntax - but you can also do this with approach 2...

Thanks.


Edit:


I am aware the approach 1 and 3 are similar (in that they both return objects) however approach 3 also creates a closure. Which approach 2 also does.

That is the basis of my question really, both 2 and 3 create closures, but what is the difference between them.

share|improve this question
    
In Approach 2 the new keyword shouldn't be there. –  Halcyon Apr 19 '13 at 16:18
1  
@FritsvanCampen - Yes it should. This creates a new object from the (anonymous) constructor function. –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 16:20
    
if the new keyword isn't there, it would be a class. –  macool Apr 19 '13 at 16:20
    
there should be () operator in the second method –  Kamyar Nazeri Apr 19 '13 at 16:20
1  
@KamyarNazeri - No, the new operator takes care of calling the function. –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 16:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In approaches #2 and #3 the constructor property of the resulting objects will be different.

In practice it means that the second approach allows you to instantiate more than one object using the anonymous constructor function:

x = new function() { alert(1) };
y = new x.constructor; // shows the message too

The top answer to Module pattern vs. instance of an anonymous constructor includes a quote from Douglas Crockford in which he explains why he thinks the approach #3 is better than #2.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I hadn't thought about the constructor property. –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 16:39

The first and third approach are almost the same, in a way they both create an object literal, which is a direct child of Object class. The difference between them is that in the third approach you may have some sort of encapsulation of properties:

var obj = (function() {
    var prop = {};

    return {
        prop2: function(){ return prop };
    }
})();

Performance-wise you might consider that the third approach creates closure, while the first one does not!

However in the second approach you are merely creating a new object from an anonymous class which is not a direct child of Object class.

The correct form of the second approach is this (at least that's ecma standard):

var obj = new function() {
    var prop1 = value1;

    this.prop2 = value2;
}();

The difference between approach 2 and 3 is only their inheritance chain: (assuming obj2 is from 2nd approach and obj3 is from 3rd approach)

obj2.__proto__ == Object.prototype;  // false
obj3.__proto__ == Object.prototype;  // true

obj2 is created from an anonymous class itself:

obj2.__proto__.__proto__ == Object.prototype;  // true (there's 2 level of inheritance here)
share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by "direct child"? –  Alexey Lebedev Apr 19 '13 at 16:33
1  
any object literal is inherited directly from Object.prototype that makes it direct child of Object class : obj.__proto__ == Object.prototype –  Kamyar Nazeri Apr 19 '13 at 16:36

Approach 1
This is a single object, no class and you can't define more easy if it's complex

var obj = {
   prop: value
}

Approach 2
A non anonymous function. It will create an object out of a 'class', normalle the function is saved as a class name and can create multiple objects of the same type easily like below:

var Bycicle= function() {
    var prop1 = value1;

    this.prop2 = value2;
}
var obj1 = new Bycicle(),
    obj2 = new Bycicle();

Approach 3
An anonymous function, variables from outside the function can not interfere with variables inside the function:

var a = 10;
var obj = (function() {
    alert(a); // Alerts undefined
    var prop1 = value1;
    alert(prop1); // alerts the value of value1
    return {
        prop2: value2;
    }
})(); // Within the () you can pass arguments to the anonymous function.

More about anonymous functions: http://helephant.com/2008/08/23/javascript-anonymous-functions/

Other approaches
There also is an Object.create() and a new Object() to create new objects, which both are the same as Approach 1.

Conclusion
In the end, the object will always be the same except for the 3th one, because it's anonymous.

share|improve this answer

There's also:

var obj = Object.create({prop: ...});

This works by setting a prototype. It's much more efficient to use a prototype if you are going to have multiple objects sharing properties or methods.

var proto = {foo: function() {}},
    obj1 = Object.create(proto),
    obj2 = Object.create(proto),
    obj3 = {foo: function() {}},
    obj4 = {foo: function() {}};

In this example, obj1 and obj2 share a "foo" function, defined in "proto". Meanwhile, obj3 and obj4 each have their own "foo". If you are creating lots of objects with lots of properties, this can make a big difference in memory consumption and even performance.

This benefit is shared by use of the "new" keyword if you use a named function and assign properties to the function's prototype (ex: f.prototype.prop) before using new.

share|improve this answer

In order to understand approach 2, the reader needs to know some quite technical things about the way the new keyword works. Specifically that it will actually call the anonymous function as a constructor, rather than instantiate a new function object and dump it in the obj variable.

In order to understand approach 3, the reader just needs to understand the IIFE pattern. That pattern has become very common in javascript code over the past two years, and that is probably why that version is more commonly used.

Both versions are used to produce encapsulation, and both versions require knowledge of a complex language feature to understand. However the language feature required in approach three is more commonly known than the language feature required to understand approach two. Which is why approach three is more commonly used in the wild.

share|improve this answer
    
A co-worker once remove the new keyword from an anonymous constructor because he thought it was a typo. –  Alexey Lebedev Apr 19 '13 at 17:13

Your question should be 2 Approaches because Approach 3 is exactly like Approach 1 only the way to create that is by self execute function.

About the difference when you make an object like Approach 1 you can think about it like an object with only static function like in java. so it's always alive and you don't make instance out of it (similar to singleton) - so when you make this object:

var obj = {
    prop: value,
    func: function(){
     alert(this.prop);
    }
};

You can call it immediately:

obj.prop = 'something else';
obj.func();

Approach 2 (without the new like the comment you have got) is a classical object which you can create instances - make inherit (with js "tricks") and so on:

function Person(firstName,lastName){ // or var Person = function(...
   this.firstName = firstName;
   this.lastName= lastName;

   this.getFullName = function(){
      return this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName;
   }
}

//use
var person1 = new Person('yair','lapid');
var person2 = new Person('Naftali','Bennet');

you can put it in an array etc...
var arr = [person1,person2, new Person('shelly','yekimovits')];
share|improve this answer
    
Approach 3 creates a closure; approach 1 does not. That makes them quite different. –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 16:29
    
But that is not the question - you can call also a regular function that return an object or an airplane that return an object - he asks about the diff of creating objects - and this is not the right definition of closure btw... –  Adidi Apr 19 '13 at 16:36

There isn't a whole lot of difference between approaches 2 and 3 for one-off objects. (If you were to name the function used in approach 2, you would have defined a reusable constructor.) My impression is that approach 3 is more commonly used for these situations, but I don't see a whole lot of difference between them.

It should be noted that both approaches 2 and 3 can take arguments:

var approach2Obj = new function(formalArg) {
    var privateProp = ...;
    this.publicProp = ...;
    // more constructor logic
)(actualArg);

var approach3Obj = (function(formalArg) {
    var privateProp = ...;
    // more creation logic
    return {
        publicProp : ...;
    };
}(actualArg));

P.S. As @Alexey Lebedev points out in his answer, one difference between the two (perhaps the only one) is that approach2Obj.constructor and approach3Obj.constructor will be different. approach3Obj.constructor will be identically Object, while approach2Obj.constructor will be the anonymous function.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry basically the prop1 is to indicate private variables. The logic of the function can continue and use these variables... I will update to reflect this –  Umair Apr 19 '13 at 16:27
    
@Umair - I don't think my answer changes. Approaches 2 and 3 are basically equivalent. –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 16:32

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