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I'm seeing some strange behaviour on a web page... I have included jQuery (and jQuery UI) using regular script tags. When the page loads I see that the file is loaded (from the local browser cache as there are far-future Expires headers on the file).

However, it seems that jQuery itself initiates a new network request to fetch itself again, including a random parameter value which causes the file to download (ie not use the cached version).

A screenshot from Chrome's network tab:

jQuery loading itself... ?

This is very strange... what is happening here ?

UPDATE: The code that is triggering this behaviour is the following:

   $(window).load(function() {
     $("#t20ContentRightWrapper").toggle("slide", { direction: "right" }, 400);
   });

If I change it to this instead, the "double-loading" goes away:

   $(window).load(function() {
       $("#t20ContentRightWrapper").toggle("fade", 400);
   });

So basically, when I'm using the "slide" animation, jQuery and jQuery UI get reloaded with extra network requests, while using the "fade" animation does not.

I want to use the "slide" animation so I need to know what's going on here... !

UPDATE 2: Here's a screenshot that shows the call stack when hovering over the "Initiator" script in Chrome:

Detail

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Don't you use another library dynamically loading them ? Many libraries use jQuery. –  dystroy Apr 19 '13 at 16:56
1  
Can you show your page? –  Paul Grime Apr 19 '13 at 17:02
    
It looks like $.getScript() calls. –  Ja͢ck Apr 19 '13 at 17:05
    
Do you have iframes or loaded content ? –  dystroy Apr 19 '13 at 17:17
    
@dystroy: No, there are no iframes or externally loaded content. –  ObiWanKenobi Apr 19 '13 at 17:20

7 Answers 7

You might also try

$(function() {
   $("#t20ContentRightWrapper").toggle("slide", { direction: "right" }, 400);
});
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Have you checked the content of the callback? I know it sounds obvious but are you sure that the jquery library isn't contained in the html being returned from the ajax callback. That'd be the most likely reason for it to load twice. Check the callback response and see if it's being loaded from there.

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Which callback are you referring to? I am not initiating any Ajax requests on my own, the only thing I'm doing is to call the .toggle("slide") function... which then seems to trigger the Ajax call by itself... –  ObiWanKenobi Apr 22 '13 at 15:57

It is hard to say without the full page code, my guess is that there is code of jQuery include is inside the toggled container

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have u tried using slideToggle(), maybe something like:

 $(window).load(function() {
     $("#t20ContentRightWrapper").slideToggle();
   });

the slideToggle motion effect default is 400 anyway

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The jQuery documentation has the following warning for the .load() method -

The Ajax module also has a method named .load(). Which one is fired depends on the set of arguments passed.

You could try this instead to rule out any ambiguity

$(window).on("load", function(){
    $("#t20ContentRightWrapper").toggle("slide", { direction: "right" }, 400);
});
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Have you tried replacing the contents of #t20ContentRightWrapper with a simple paragraph? If that fixes it you can take out parts of the content to find the offending bit. Also maybe you have two elements with the same id. You could also try redownloading and replacing your jquery.js file. You can still get 1.7.1 from github. But I would try the current version as well and keep it unless it breaks stuff if I were you.

If the problem persists, it would be helpful if you could say what browsers/OSes and versions can we reproduce this on?

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The load function means something different than what I think you're expecting:

This method is the simplest way to fetch data from the server. It is roughly equivalent to $.get(url, data, success) except that it is a method rather than global function and it has an implicit callback function. When a successful response is detected (i.e. when textStatus is "success" or "notmodified"), .load() sets the HTML contents of the matched element to the returned data. This means that most uses of the method can be quite simple:

maybe you want to use this instead:

`

$(function() {
     $("#t20ContentRightWrapper").toggle("slide", { direction: "right" }, 400);
   });

`

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