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Apparently my education has failed me, because I didn't realize that methods in C# cannot be serialized. (Good to know.)

I am trying to create a WCF service that returns a simple class I created. The problem is that this simple class contains methods that I want to expose, and the caller of my service won't have any access to them (assuming they won't have a .dll containing the class declaration).

public class Simple
{
    public string Message { get; set; }
    private const string _Hidden = "Underpants";

    public string Hidden
    {
        get { return _Hidden; }
    }

    public string GetHidden()
    {
        return _Hidden;
    }
}

I set up a WCF service (let's call it MyService) to return an instance of my Simple class. To my frustration, I'm only getting a partial build of my class back.

public void CallService()
{
    using (var client = new MyService.Serviceclient())
    {
        Simple result = client.GetSimple();
        string message = result.Message; // this works.
        string hidden = result.Hidden;  // this doesn't.
        string fail = result.GetHidden(); // Underpants remains elusive.
    }
}

Is there any type of workaround where I'm able to set up a property or method on my class that will be accessible to whomever calls my service? How does one handle constants or other methods that are set up in a class that only exists in a service?

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2  
Ideally you create a contract aka a simple POCO class that's just public properties and serialize that. Have some other method that populates the POCO from whatever internal business logic/data you have. –  cgotberg Apr 19 '13 at 17:40
2  
Your users call your WCF to execute your logic, not to get the logic back to execute on their system. Execution of your logic (on the server) generally results in data (and only data) that is sent back to the client to do with in whatever way it needs. –  Peter Ritchie Apr 19 '13 at 17:41
    
Both really valid points, thank you. @cgotberg, you got my mind working in the right direction. Much obliged! –  MadHenchbot Apr 19 '13 at 18:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As far as I know the only things that can be returned in a WCF service are primitives or a class with public properties that have a get method on them. From a high level WCF exists to allow you to specify a contract between the client and the server that it in theory transportation agnostic (ie you can swap out an HTTP endpoint for a netTcp endpoint and the service will function the same way from a contractual level).

The question to answer then is what data are you trying to pass back in this service call. If it's an object called simple with the data points of Message and Hidden then I would advise creating a data class called Simple that has those values as properties:

[DataContract]
public class Simple
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Hidden { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public string Message { get; set; }
}

When the client receives the response back Message and Hidden will be populated with whatever you have set their values to on the server side.

The DataMember attribute can only be used on properties and fields. This means that a WCF response can only serialize these types.

If you really want to only use the const in your WCF contract You could convert it to a field and place the DataMember attribute on it:

public class Simple
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Message { get; set; }

    [DataMember]
    public const string Hidden = "Underpants";
}

To be able to do this the field must be accessible (public).

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My main issue was that I didn't take the time to create a contract class that contained only data, not logic. This approach makes much more sense than the direction I was going in. Thank you! –  MadHenchbot Apr 19 '13 at 18:38
1  
When it comes to OO programming that's the right instinct to have. The boundaries between applications (in this case the client and server) are a different case as described in this article: blog.ploeh.dk/2011/05/31/… –  Phil Patterson Apr 19 '13 at 19:00

Typically you would create three different projects.

 1. Service project
 2. Client project 
 3. Data project

The Data project contains only the data classes - no application code. The methods and constants in these data classes should be independent of the Service/Client projects. The Data project is included as a reference in both the Service and Client projects so that serialization and deserialization happen against the same binary - and you get to retain your constants/methods/etc.

The downside here is that all your clients will either have to be .NET apps, or you will have to provide different data libraries for each platform you wish to support.

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Add the DataMember attribute to your property. To do so, you must have both a get and a set defined.

[DataMember]
public string Hidden
{
    get { return _Hidden; }
    set { }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Weird. In my case, it became accessible as soon as I added the empty set { }, even without specifying the DataMember attribute. I'm not sure why this works, but thank you! –  MadHenchbot Apr 19 '13 at 18:16
1  
I think that if you don't mark the class with DataContractAttribute, DataMemberAttribute is unnecessary. You're supposed to mark it with DataContractAttribute to show that it's serializable, but as you've seen, it works both ways. –  Tim S. Apr 19 '13 at 18:21

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