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I do not understand why those scripts act differently:

class A:
  x=3
  y=5
  __z=8
  def __init__(self):
    print "Hi, I am an instance object of A class!"
    print "I have two components: x i y"
    print "Component x =", self.x
    print "Component y =", self.y
    print 'Component z=', self.__z, 'but z is private'
  def fun1(self):
    return self.x+self.y
class B(A):
  pass 
i=B()
print i.x, i.y, i.fun1()      

If I delete i=B() line and change last line to print B().x, B().y, B().fun1(), strings in __init__ are printed three times, as the class A is created everytime I call its methods. Why same thing doesn't happen when I create "i" instance?

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4  
B() literally means "Hey Python, create a brand new instance of the B class, call its __init__ method with no extra parameters, and return the result." So, as computers tend to do, it's doing exactly what you asked it to. –  abarnert Apr 19 '13 at 18:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You created only one instance of B:

i=B()

So __init__ is called only once. In your other example, you created a new instance of B three times.

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Because __init__ only runs once (outside of the situation, which is so rare as to assumed to be "never", where it is called explicitly) per created instance. Create 1 instance, run __init__ once, create 3 instances, run __init__ 3 times. Every time you call B(), you create a new instance.

Also, note that your class attributes x, y, and __z, belong to the class itself, not to it's instances; referencing them off self as you are doing is another issue arising from your apparent misunderstanding about the difference between classes and instances that will cause you problems.

A class can be thought of as a definition of an object. When you call a class (B()), you create an instance of it. Class attributes belong to the definition itself, while instance attributes belong to the object.

Think of a class like a die for a stamping machine. Imagine you have a die for making car fenders. Each fender is an object instance. Each fender has a color, which is an instance attribute. However, the die itself can also have a color, and that would be a class attribute. Each bumper can have a different color, and you can change the color of any fender without changing the color of any other fender or of the die, but there is only one die no matter how many fenders are created, and it can have only one color.

>>> class Fender(object):
...     color = 'red'
...     def __init__(self):
...         self.color = None
...
>>> fenders = [Fender(), Fender()]
>>> Fender.color
'red'
>>> fenders[0].color = 'blue'
>>> fenders[1].color = 'grey'
>>> fenders[0].color
'blue'
>>> fenders[1].color
'grey'
>>> Fender.color
'red'
>>> fenders[0].__class__.color
'red'
>>> Fender.color = 'black'
>>> fenders[0].color
'blue'
>>> fenders[1].color
'grey'
>>> Fender.color
'black'
>>> fenders[0].__class__.color
'black'
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