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Using a for loop and the rand to generate 100 random numbers and print out the smalles and biggest. Any guidance if im heading in the right direction.

int main()
{
    int x = rand();
    for( x = 0; x < 100; x++)
    {
        if( x < x )
        {
            cout << "Small numbers: " << endl;
            cout << x << endl;
        }
        if ( x > x )
        {
            cout << "Big numbers: " << endl;
            cout << x << endl;
        }
    }
    system("pause");
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Hans Passant, K-ballo, H2CO3, Andrew Barber Apr 19 '13 at 19:22

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
Um, you really need more than one variable here. – Fred Larson Apr 19 '13 at 19:08
1  
You want to save the current roll, the maximum roll, the lowest roll, and the number of rolls you already did. Try to figure out what you need to do. Don't name your variables x, give them meaningful names like currentNumber or lowestValue. – Zeta Apr 19 '13 at 19:10
1  
Imagine you were rolling dice in real life and had a piece of paper on which you could write and update the current lowest and highest numbers seen so far. Then think about how that can translate to your code. – YXD Apr 19 '13 at 19:12
2  
What do we do now that the homework tag is gone? – Nick Vaccaro Apr 19 '13 at 19:13
3  
I see what you guys are saying appreaciate the help thank you. – JL22 Apr 19 '13 at 19:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>



using namespace std;


int main()
{


   int smallest = INT_MAX;
   int largest = 0;

   for( int x = 0; x < 100; x++)
   {
      int randomNumber = rand() % 100 + 1; 
      cout << "Next number: " << randomNumber ;
      if( randomNumber > largest )
      {
        largest = randomNumber ;
      }

      if ( randomNumber  < smallest )
      {
        smallest = randomNumber ;
      }
    }

    cout << "Smallest number: " << smallest;
    cout << "Largest number:"<< largest;
    system("pause");

}
share|improve this answer
1  
please fix indentation! – Fredrik Pihl Apr 19 '13 at 19:17
    
this is wrong ! are you comparing values of loop index and largest/smallest? – where_is_tftp Apr 19 '13 at 19:31
    
Sorry, that was a typo! – NINCOMPOOP Apr 19 '13 at 19:33
    
max rand is RAND_MAX – where_is_tftp Apr 19 '13 at 20:16
if( x < x )

and

if (x > x)

will never be true. Your logic is not right.

You may do something like the following:

int main()
{
    //set up seed
    srand(time(NULL));

    double min = 1000; //you can also use numeric limits
    double max = -1000;
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i)
    {
       double r = rand(); //you can also generate rand in given range
       if (r > max)
       {
          max = r;
       }
       if (r < min)
       {
          min = r;
       }
    }
    cout << min  << " " << max <<endl;
    cin.get(); //don't use system pause
}
share|improve this answer
2  
"You should first generate 100 random numbers and store them,then find smallest and biggest." The additional space isn't needed at all. – Zeta Apr 19 '13 at 19:11
    
@Zeta I agree. I was trying to be simple since OP does not seem to have enough programming experience. so correct first then optimize is my intention. – taocp Apr 19 '13 at 19:12
3  
Storing 100 numbers isn't simpler. – Fred Larson Apr 19 '13 at 19:13
    
@FredLarson I'd better remove that sentence. thanks. – taocp Apr 19 '13 at 19:17
    
rand() returns an integer value in the range [0, RAND_MAX]. There is no truncation storing the result in an int, and no particular reason for using a double instead. – Pete Becker Apr 19 '13 at 19:22

the first thing is, that you have to generate new random int each time you cross the loop, so you want something like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <limits>


using namespace std;


int main()
{

int x = rand();
int min=RAND_MAX;
int max=0;

for( int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    x = rand();

    if( x < min )
    {
        cout << "Small numbers: " << endl;
        cout << x << endl;
        min=x;
    }

    if ( x > max )
    {
        cout << "Big numbers: " << endl;
        cout << x << endl;
        max=x;
    }
}


system("pause");

 }
share|improve this answer
    
Using x as the loop control variable and as the value of the generated random value will not work. – Pete Becker Apr 19 '13 at 19:27
    
well, rather yes, might be true, typo – where_is_tftp Apr 19 '13 at 19:29
    
Not so much a typo as a copy of the original code. <g> – Pete Becker Apr 19 '13 at 19:39

Your code is not going to do anything because you're comparing the same variable.

You will need to set up a list or array in order to sort, and then compare elements, rearrange accordingly, and then iterate over the list and display in order.

C++ standard libraries can help this process:

Sort

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that would work, but it's total overkill for this task. All you need to track is the largest and smallest value seen to date. – Pete Becker Apr 19 '13 at 19:26

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