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The part of this code where it says if (bar = true) it cant find the variable "bar" that i create in if (foo == "True") or if (foo == "False").

Code:

string foo = Console.ReadLine();

if (foo == "True") {
    bool bar = true;
}
if (foo == "False") {
    bool bar = false;
}

if (bar = true) {
    Console.WriteLine("This is true");
}
else {
    Console.WriteLine("This is false");
}
share|improve this question
1  
there are some errors in your code... wonder if this would even compile –  Mare Infinitus Apr 19 '13 at 19:10
1  
Note that comparing a boolean to true in the form if (somebool == true) is widely considered as superfluous code. if(somebool) is generally preferred, and if(!somebool) would be the replacement for == false. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 19 '13 at 19:12
1  
Anthony's suggestion also helps avoid one of the errors in the given code (bar = true is an assignment, not a comparison...) –  Dan J Apr 19 '13 at 19:14

8 Answers 8

You're declaring a new bar inside each if block, so it's not a valid identifier outside of that scope. You need to declare it outside of your if blocks, like this

bool bar = false;
if (foo == "True")
{
    bar = true;
}
if (foo == "False")
{
    bar = false;
}

if (bar == true)
{
    Console.WriteLine("This is true");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("This is false");
}

Or for that matter, this would work just as well:

bool bar = (foo == "True");

if (bar == true)
{
    Console.WriteLine("This is true");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("This is false");
}

Or even:

Console.WriteLine("This is {0}", foo == "True");
share|improve this answer
    
Basically the second check is not necessary. It will be false anyway –  treze Apr 19 '13 at 19:11
    
@treze Yes, I was trying to modify the original code as little as possible in the first part of my answer. –  p.s.w.g Apr 19 '13 at 19:13

A better way to parse:

string foo = Console.ReadLine();
bool bar;
if (!bool.TryParse(foo, out bar))
    // inform the user, maybe have them try again

Console.WriteLine("This is {0}", bar);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 For that matter, eliminate the final if block entirely and just call: Console.WriteLine(String.Format("This is {0}", bar)); :) –  Dan J Apr 19 '13 at 19:13
1  
Even better: Console.WriteLine("This is {0}", bar);. If you're doing more with the boolean, an if/else block may be entirely appropriate, of course. –  Tim S. Apr 19 '13 at 19:16
    
Oh yeah, Console.WriteLine() has composite formatting built in... –  Dan J Apr 19 '13 at 21:46

You're messing up the scope of your variables.

bar only exists within the scope of your if statement.

Declare it outside the first if statement.

Also, this is not a comparison: if (bar = true)

This is: `if (bar == true)

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You're creating bar inside 2 different if statements. Their scope is limited to those ifs. When execution leaves the ifs, neither bar is visible (hence why they don't conflict with each other). Try something more like this:

bool bar = false;
if (foo == "True")
{
    bar = true;
}
if (foo == "False")
{
    bar = false;
}

if (bar == true)
{
    Console.WriteLine("This is true");
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("This is false");
}

Or for all around better code:

bool bar = foo == "True";
Console.WriteLine("This is " + bar);
share|improve this answer
    
This won't compile since bar is not definitely assigned before you read it. You should initialise it to false in the declaration. –  Lee Apr 19 '13 at 19:12
1  
Wasn't thinking about that. My mind was too fogged over with how horrible all the original code is. –  Corey Ogburn Apr 19 '13 at 19:13

bar variable should be declared out of scope of if/else statement

bool bar;
if (foo == "True")
{
    bar = true;
}
else
{
    bar = false;
}

p.s. you can also use bool.Parse method for assign bool value.

share|improve this answer

Declare bar outside the scope of those ifs. When the block in which they are declared closes they are forgotten.

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Two things:

First, you define bar inside each if-block. It is not visible outside the respective if-blocks. They are said to have a local scope.

Second, you musst use bar == true instead of bar = true. = is the assignment operator, == is the equality operator.

The following will work:

string foo = Console.ReadLine();
bool bar;

if (foo == "True")
    bar = true;

if (foo == "False")
    bar = false;

if (bar == true)
    Console.WriteLine("This is true");
else
    Console.WriteLine("This is false");
share|improve this answer

Bar is a local variable in your code. You need to take it out the if statement block

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