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So I'm currently working on a project that's intended to help teach me more about hash tables

However, I'm having major difficulty implementing the HashTable's data member which is supposed to be an array of template link lists, which are of type KeyValuePair.

One of the requirements of the program is that I implement chained addressing, and that the user is allowed to initialize the Data array's length, so I'm pretty much forced to use an array of linked lists.

Since I'm having trouble with insertions on my Data member, I've assumed that there may be something I'm doing wrong with my Data member declaration (at the bottom of the following code segment):

template <typename DATA_TYPE>
class HashTable
{
    typedef pair<const int, DATA_TYPE> KeyValuePair;

private:
    int Size;
    int Keys;
    list<KeyValuePair>* Data;

As I understand, this should allow me to point to elements of an array of Linked lists.

However, when it comes to initializing my array (and inserting to my array, which I will show you later) I can't quite figure out what's wrong.

This is my constructor plus destructor:

public:
HashTable(const int& size = INITIAL_SIZE)
{
    assert( size > 0 );
    Keys = 0;
    Size = size;
    Data = new list<KeyValuePair>[Size];
    /*for(int i = 0; i<Capacity; i++)
        Data[i] = new list<DATA_TYPE>;*/
}

~HashTable()
{
    delete[] Data;
}

and this is my insert function, which causes a breakpoint to occur in std::list, which (I think) is caused because I'm trying to access a NULL ".Next" pointer with list.merge(). But I'm not sure:

void Insert(const DATA_TYPE& value)
{
    int hashIndex;
    hashIndex = HashCode(value);

    KeyValuePair* newPair = new KeyValuePair(hashIndex, value);
    list<KeyValuePair>* newHash = new  list<KeyValuePair>;

    newHash->push_back(*newPair);
    while(hashIndex>Size)
    {
        hashIndex-=Size;
    }
    //Data[hashIndex]->push_back(value);
    Data[hashIndex].merge(*newHash);
}

I've just been working on this for the past couple of days, and really need some fresh eyes to look over what I'm doing, and affirm or assist my thinking...

share|improve this question
    
You have a memory leak in Insert. You allocate a list for newHash but don't delete it. Just declare it as a local, no need to use dynamic storage here. – Captain Obvlious Apr 19 '13 at 19:42
    
Oh thank you. Im not great with pointers. Ill take note of that – stocklett Apr 19 '13 at 20:04
    
You're also leaking newPair since you store in the list by value instead of by pointer. Again you can use a local variable. – Captain Obvlious Apr 19 '13 at 20:06

Why are you deleting Data in the constructor

HashTable(const int& size = INITIAL_SIZE)
{
    Keys = 0;
    Size = size;
    if(size!=INITIAL_SIZE)
    {
        delete[] Data;  <------------
        Data = new list<KeyValuePair>[Size];
    }
}

there is nothing to delete, just do

 HashTable( int size = INITIAL_SIZE)
{
    assert ( size > 0 );
    Keys = 0;
    Size = size;
    Data = new list<KeyValuePair>[Size];
}

also

while(hashIndex>Size)
{
    hashIndex-=Size;
}
//Data[hashIndex]->push_back(value);
Data[hashIndex].merge(*newHash);

if hashIndex == Size, you will be accessing an out of bound element.

share|improve this answer
1  
And if size != INITIAL_SIZE the member Data never gets initialized – Akobold Apr 19 '13 at 19:38
    
You'll be allocating a zero length array if size is 0. – Captain Obvlious Apr 19 '13 at 19:43
    
Ah, thank you. That's defititely a better way to do it. But Ive been testing the program with the default array size, so, while Ive been testing, my program size has always been equal to INITIAL_SIZE. So my problem still stands... – stocklett Apr 19 '13 at 19:57
    
The reason I was deleting Data was because I was originally declaring it as list<KeyValuePair>* Data[INITIAL_SIZE]; and thought that I'd have to delete the values in my constructor because of it... But again, I'm still just getting the hang of memory management; I'm ignorant! – stocklett Apr 19 '13 at 20:33
    
Went ahead and updated my code with your suggestions – stocklett Apr 19 '13 at 21:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Figured it out!

So, one of the hardest problems about this is that there isn't any way to view the data elements of an array pointer in the debug window, since it's always only pointing to the beginning or some point in the array.

But, regardless, (other than fixing the memory leaks that were in my original code) the main problem was (just as I thought) that I was attempting to merge an initialized linked list with an uninitialized one.

To solve this, in the code snippet below, I've used the std::list.push_back() function. Which Initializes the list and will not overwrite any values that may already be in that hashindex.

To check that I'm actually hashing values, I've created a search function which (given a data value) finds the index and outputs the string that's saved at that index.

void Insert(const DATA_TYPE& value)
{
    int hashIndex;
    hashIndex = HashCode(value);

    KeyValuePair newPair = KeyValuePair(hashIndex, value);

    while(hashIndex>Size)
    {
        hashIndex-=Size;
    }

    Data[hashIndex].push_back(newPair);
}

(had to wait before I could post the answer, sadly)

share|improve this answer

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