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Is it advisable to use the "new" keyword in a derived interface to provide a more-derived return value for a property or method having the same name?

Say I have an interface IDocument:

public interface IDocument
{
    IParagraphs Paragraphs { get; }

    IRevisions Revisions { get; }

    IStyles Styles { get; }
}

And a derived one IRtfDocument.

public interface IRtfDocument: IDocument
{
   string Rtf { get; }
   ...
}

I also have more-derived interfaces for IParagraphs, IRevisions and IStyles: IRtfParagraphs, IRtfRevisions, IRtfStyles. A number of RTF-specific needs drove their creation.

When I access the paragraphs of an RTF document, I'd like to avoid casting them to IRtfParagraphs. Same for revisions and styles. It would also be nice to avoid having both "IRtfParagraphs" and "IParagraphs". So what I'd like to do is this:

public interface IRtfDocument : IDocument
{
    new IRtfParagraphs Paragraphs { get; }

    new IRtfRevisions Revisions { get; }

    new IRtfStyles Styles { get; }

    string Rtf { get; }
}

Is this considered good practice? It seems to fit in this situation, but I wanted to run it by you C# veterans.

Update: So I actually went ahead and tried using "new" as described in my interfaces. My RtfDocument class ended up needing both an IDocument.Styles property and an IRtfDocument.Styles property. While I could just have the IDocument.Styles property return the value of IRtfDocument.Styles, that doesn't feel quite right as I'm implementing two properties.

It seems the compiler doesn't account for the fact that IRtfStyles derives from IStyles, so it insists I have both. It would be nice if the Liskov Substitution Principle let me just implement IRtfDocument.Styles in the RtfDocument class.

share|improve this question
    
Whoops let me fix the example, my bad. –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 19:43
2  
PS, quit voting to close me before I even get a chance to fix the question. Thanks. –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 19:44
    
@System.Cats.Lol Voting to close means the the question, as is, should be closed. If the question is edited such that it should no longer be closed then it can be re-opened. –  Servy Apr 19 '13 at 19:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is big potential problem with your use of the new modifier. Suppose we use your interfaces:

public interface IFoo
{
    string Name { get; set; }
}

public interface IEnhancedFoo : IFoo
{
    int BarCount { get; set; }
}

public interface IFooBox
{
    IFoo Foo { get; set; }
}

public interface IEnhancedFooBox : IFooBox
{
    new IEnhancedFoo Foo { get; set; }
}

Build out our classes:

public class EnhancedFooBox : IEnhancedFooBox
{
    public IEnhancedFoo Foo { get; set; }

    IFoo IFooBox.Foo { get; set; }
}

public class FooBase : IFoo
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class EnhancedFoo : IEnhancedFoo
{
    public int BarCount { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Build some methods that take interfaces...

static void Test1(IFooBox myBlah)
{
    myBlah.Foo = new FooBase();
    myBlah.Foo.Name = "FooBase";
}

static void Test2(IEnhancedFooBox myBlah)
{
    myBlah.Foo = new EnhancedFoo();
    myBlah.Foo.Name = "EnhancedFoo";
}

And then use this logic:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var myBlah = new EnhancedFooBox();
    Test2(myBlah); //first assign name to EnhancedFoo
    Test1(myBlah); //second assign name to FooBase
    Console.Write(myBlah.Foo.Name);
    Console.ReadKey();
}

What is the expected output? Should it be FooBase or EnhancedFoo?

EnhancedFoo

Programmers unaware the property has been modified to new, will not get the expected output. This is solved using generics.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good argument for generics; see my updated example--in practice, we're not setting state so much as returning values, and want to avoid lots of casting to the more-derived interfaces. –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 20:13
    
The problem is that if someone else starts writing any functions that take interfaces (e.g. your IDocument interface) they will unknowingly modifying values that are not publicly available on the cast without casting. –  Erik Philips Apr 19 '13 at 20:20
    
If I avoid having both the base and derived versions of the property in my actual class, though...that is, I have just one Paragraphs property in an RtfParagraphs class...how is this bad? I might need to see an example, the updated question seems like a natural fit for "new". –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 20:24
1  
Oh, wait...I can't do that, can I? I have to have both an IDocument.Paragraphs and an IRtfDocument.Paragraphs. So much for saving time with "new". Better to just cast. –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 20:33

The easier solution would probably just be to have a generic interface:

public interface IFooBox<T>
    where T : IFoo
{
   T Foo { get; }
}

You can then have an IFooBox<IFoo> for your basic objects, or an IFooBox<IEnhancedFoo> for the enhanced version.

share|improve this answer
2  
That makes sense, but my example was contrived; in practice we have a derived interface with a number of more-derived interfaces that we'd like to "hide". Think IEnhancedFoo, IEnhancedBar, IEnhancedBaz etc. Would not want to have to parameterize those. –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 19:46
    
@System.Cats.Lol Well, it sounds like they should be generic as that's the behavior you seem to expect from them. If you can't be bothered to do this and you feel that creating an additional interface for each return value then that's fine; feel free to use your solution. –  Servy Apr 19 '13 at 19:48

This type of definition will force implementers of IEnhancedFooBox to explicitly implement IFoo.Foo separately from the implementation of IEnhancedFooBox.Foo. Since this work gets tedious, I tend to reserve this for cases where a generic interface extends a non-generic interface.

For example, consider the following interfaces.

interface IFutureValue {
    object Result { get; }
}

interface IFutureValue<T> : IFutureValue {
    new T Result { get; }
}

It is possible to implement a general handler for all "future values" by working with IFutureValue, where code working with future values of a specific type can work with IFutureValue<T>.

share|improve this answer
    
You guys answered my question but my question needs more detail to approximate our actual interfaces; we have lots of return types to "hide". Let me edit the question to provide a better example. Thank you though :) –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 19:53

To answer the question,

Is this considered good practice?

The use of new is frowned upon, in general. However, as with all frowning in programming, it is a matter of judgement. If you have found a use for new that makes sense in your context, and you've ruled out other avenues like @Servy's example, then rock the new. Be prepared to defend your decision though.

share|improve this answer
    
Check out updated question; it looks like a better fit for "new". –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 20:01
    
But my answer remains the same. new is still frowned upon in general, but not in all specific cases. If your question has changed to, "Would this specific use of new pass a code review?", I would refer you to codereview.stackexchange.com ;) –  Mike McCaughan Apr 19 '13 at 20:13
    
Free code reviews? For reals? That's pretty cool. I'll ask on there if nobody follows up with a good answer on here. –  System.Cats.Lol Apr 19 '13 at 20:17

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