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public class CircleGeometricObject extends GeometricObject  {

    private double radius;

    public CircleGeometricObject() {}
    public CircleGeometricObject(double radius) {
        this. radius = radius;
    }
    public CircleGeometricObject(double radius, String color, boolean filled) {
        this. radius = radius;
        setColor(color);
        setFilled( filled);
    }
}
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closed as not a real question by arshajii, rgettman, Brent Worden, sjngm, Peter Ritchie Apr 20 '13 at 0:09

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It depends on your requirement. –  The New Idiot Apr 19 '13 at 20:24
2  
:) what does "13 String color" mean here? –  ses Apr 19 '13 at 20:24
4  
Consider putting some effort into formatting your code well before posting. We greatly appreciate your efforts here. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 19 '13 at 20:25
2  
Please state what exactly is bothering you and what you would prefer. –  gzm0 Apr 19 '13 at 20:26
1  
What have you tried so far? Why do you think you need the first two constructors? What happens without them? –  cyroxx Apr 19 '13 at 20:31
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3 Answers

If you wanted to reduce code duplication you could do something like below (add some null checking though). It's possibly over the top for your example, but for constructors with lots of code it can be useful to reduce duplication.

public class MyClass {
    private Double radius;

    public MyClass() {
        this(null, null, null);
    }

    public class MyClass(Double radius) {
        this(radius, null, null)
    }

    public class MyClass(Double radius, String colour, boolean filled) {
        this.radius = radius;
        setColour(colour);
        setFilled(filled);
    }
}

** edited to change double to Double to allow null

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I am not sure to correclty understand the question. Do you ask why you have to override the constructor of GeometricObject ?

It is not mandatory the following code compile :

public class CircleGeometricObject extends GeometricObject
{
private double radius;

public CircleGeometricObject(double radius, String color, boolean filled)
{
    this.radius = radius;
    setColor(color);
    setFilled(filled);
}
}    

You implement the constructors that you need.

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Had to create a testcase, since it's been so long, and this was always a sort of fuzzy area:

public class ConstrTest {
    protected String fieldA;
    protected String fieldB;
    public static void main(String[] argV) {
        ConstrTestSub sub1 = new ConstrTestSub("111", "222");
        sub1.print();
        // ConstrTestSub sub2 = new ConstrTestSub();
        // sub2.print();
    }
    public ConstrTest() {
        this("ABC","XYZ");
    }
    public ConstrTest(String a) {
        this(a, "YYY");
    }
    public ConstrTest(String a, String b) {
        fieldA = a;
        fieldB = b;
    }
    public void print() {
        System.out.println("fieldA = " + fieldA + ", fieldB = " + fieldB);
    }
}

class ConstrTestSub extends ConstrTest {
    private String fieldC;
    public ConstrTestSub(String a, String b) {
        super(a, b);
        fieldC = "QQQ";
    }
    public void print() {
        System.out.println("fieldA = " + fieldA + ", fieldB = " + fieldB + ", fieldC = " + fieldC);
    }
}

The above code compiles and runs fine, and the ConstTestSub constructor executes the corresponding super version appropriately (which it would do even without the explicit super invocation).

If you uncomment the second new ConstTestSub in main, though, it will not compile, since the () version of the constructor is not defined.

So, if you're going to define your constructors at all, and if you need multiple forms, you must define all the forms you need. (They can, of course, just be cascaded if that's sufficient.)

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