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I was always taught that in Javascript there is no distinction between objects and classes. Then can someone explain why this code generate error:

var firstObj = function() {};

firstObj.prototype.sayHi = function() {
document.write("Hi!");
};

firstObj.sayHi();

Whereas this one works:

var firstObj = function() {};

firstObj.prototype.sayHi = function() {
document.write("Hi!");
};

new firstObj().sayHi();

What's the difference? Why isn't the first one working?

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Classes do not exist in javascript... –  jondavidjohn Apr 19 '13 at 21:06
    
@jondavidjohn - Not yet, but class is a future reserved word, so stay tuned! :) –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 21:09

4 Answers 4

The key issue here is that your firstObj variable is a Function object, not a firstObj object. This is a subtle distinction, but the type of object determines which prototype it inherits.

The prototype is like a template that is applied to newly created objects of a particular type. You must create a firstObj object (usually with new which invokes the constructor and assigns a prototype) in order to have that template applied to it. In the first example, your firstObj variable is a Function object, not a firstObj object so it has the prototype of a Function not of anything else..

In your second example, you actually create a firstObj object so it inherits the prototype for that type of object.

If you want the method applied in your first example so it works on the function object you've already created, just put the method directly on your already existing function object, not on the prototype.

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in the first example, firstObj.prototype.sayHi is defined. so when calling firstObj.sayHi(), why wouldn't the js engine just 'walk up the prototype' chain and find a reference to it? –  sshen Apr 19 '13 at 20:58
2  
@sshen - Because firstObj is just a Function object. It isn't a firstObj object. You have to actually create a firstObj object to inherit the prototype. –  jfriend00 Apr 19 '13 at 21:03
    
grats, really short answer and good explanation –  laconbass Apr 19 '13 at 21:22

There is no difference in the language between objects and classes1. However, there is a big difference between one kind of object and another. In the first case:

firstObj.sayHi();

you are trying to access the sayHi property of firstObj, which is a Function object that does not have such a property. (You could, however, do firstObj.prototype.sayHi().)

In the second case:

new firstObj().sayHi();

you are first invoking the new operator on the firstObj object, which evaluates to a new object. That new object has firstObj as it's constructor property and a prototype equal to the prototype property of firstObj. You are then accessing the sayHi property of that returned object, which succeeds because sayHi is in the prototype chain for that object.

1 Technically, JavaScript doesn't have classes2 (in the traditional sense), just constructor functions that are usually called "classes".

2 However, class is a future reserved word.

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when you write this:

var firstObj = function() {};

you only define a constructor function, thus you need to use the key word new for the new objects created with this constructor function.

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A function is just a function until new is issued. At that point, a Function Object is created based on the prototype for the function. That is why you will not see the sayHi method present in the first version.

Also, firstObj is a function, and not an object, so you need to invoke it to actually have anything happen. firstObj will not actually invoke the function, you must use firstObj().

Further, there are ways to have the prototype used without explicitly requiring the new keyword. This is done in a number of popular frameworks (such as jQuery). It is done by checking to see if new was used, and if it was not, then it news one up for you on the spot:

jsFiddle Demo

var firstObj = function() {
 if( !(this instanceof firstObj) ){
  return new firstObj();   
 }
};

firstObj.prototype.sayHi = function() {
 alert("hi");
};

firstObj().sayHi();
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This is misleading at best. firstObj is an instance of Function (i.e., firstObj.prototype === Function). And Function instances are most certainly objects. Also, (new firstObj).sayHi() (without the parens after firstObj) works just as well as OP's second code. The parens are needed because otherwise it would be evaluated as new ((firstObj.sayHi)()). –  Ted Hopp Apr 19 '13 at 21:03
    
I think you misunderstood what I meant when I said a Function object. A Function instance is an object. However, firstObj.prototype === Function is false. Moreover, typeof new firstObj === object whereas typeof firstObj === function. Using parenthesis in that fashion causes new firstObj to become an expression which is why that works. var fO = new firstObj;fO.sayHi() would be another way of looking at that. When you use new, you do not need to invoke the function, it is implicit. –  Travis J Apr 19 '13 at 21:26
    
Yeah, I was wrong about firstObj.prototype; I meant that the prototype of firstObj (not the prototype property) is Function (firstObj instanceof Function is true). So it is firstObj, not new firstObj that is a Function object. ((new firstObj()) instanceof Function is false, as is (new firstObj) instanceof Function.) Your second paragraph has additional misleading information: all functions in JavaScript are, in fact, objects (firstObj instanceof Object is also true). (After all, that's why it can have a prototype property.) –  Ted Hopp Apr 21 '13 at 1:00

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