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I have two processes linked; let's say they're A and B, with A set to trap exits. I want to be able to recover a piece of the B's process data if someone calls exit/2 on it, e.g. exit(B, diediedie).

In B's module, let's call it bmod.erl, I have some code that looks like this:

-module(bmod).
-export([b_start/2]).

b_start(A, X) ->
    spawn(fun() -> b_main(A, X) end).

b_main(A, X) ->
      try
        A ! {self(), doing_stuff},
        do_stuff()
      catch
        exit:_ -> exit({terminated, X})
      end,
      b_main(A, X).

do_stuff() -> io:format("doing stuff.~n",[]).

And in A's module, let's call it amod.erl, I have some code that looks like this:

-module(amod).
-export([a_start/0]).

a_start() ->
  process_flag(trap_exit, true),
  link(bmod:b_start(self(), some_stuff_to_do)),
  a_main().

a_main() ->
  receive
    {Pid, doing_stuff} ->
      io:format("Process ~p did stuff.~n",[Pid]),
      exit(Pid, diediedie),
      a_main();
    {'EXIT', Pid, {terminated, X}} ->
      io:format("Process ~p was terminated, had ~p.~n", [Pid,X]),
      fine;
    {'EXIT', Pid, _Reason} ->
      io:format("Process ~p was terminated, can't find what it had.~n", [Pid]),
      woops
  end.

(I realize that I should do spawn_link normally but in my original program there is code in between the spawn and the link, and so I modeled this example code this way.)

Now when I run the code, I get this.

2> c(amod).
{ok,amod}
3> c(bmod).
{ok,bmod}
4> amod:a_start().
doing stuff.
Process <0.44.0> did stuff.
doing stuff.
Process <0.44.0> did stuff.
Process <0.44.0> was terminated, can't find what it had.
woops
5> 

How do I get b_main() to catch this external exit so it can report its state X?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For b_main() to catch the external exit, it has to trap exit by calling process_flag(trap_exit, true). This will result in a message to the process where it can exit with the state X. The code is as below

b_start(A, X) ->
    spawn(fun() -> process_flag(trap_exit, true), b_main(A, X) end).

b_main(A, X) ->
    try
        A ! {self(), doing_stuff},
        do_stuff()
    catch
        exit:_ -> 
            io:format("exit inside do_stuff() . ~n"),
            exit({terminated, X})
    end,

    receive
        {'EXIT',Pid, Reason} ->
            io:format("Process received exit ~p ~p.~n",[Pid, Reason]),
            exit({terminated, X})
    after 0 ->
            ok
    end,
    b_main(A, X).
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the code example, much appreciated! –  2rs2ts Apr 20 '13 at 22:44
    
I've run into some problems with my code: I can't seem to export the result of my computation in the try block (using of) in order to call the recursive loop. I get the unsafe warning. –  2rs2ts Apr 20 '13 at 23:13
1  
do you mean something like try Res = do_stuff ..... end where Res is usafe outside? Yes it is you need do something like Res = try do_stuff .... end. Then use Res. The last stmnt of block returns the value which can be assigned and used. This goes true for stmnts inside try, even catch, case and if. –  Vinod Apr 21 '13 at 4:17
1  
catch block can catch throw, error and exit. You can call exit in your do_stuff on error or on completion of the task which most probably you may not. But if you do, you can again exit with the status you want. Yes modifying the code is a better option as the one which i gave was just an example on how to receive exit signal. –  Vinod Apr 21 '13 at 16:21
1  
One more thing, the above rule also applies for receive, anything and everything in Erlang. Oops except for throw, error, exit and stuffs –  Vinod Apr 21 '13 at 16:28

The short answer: you should do trap_exit in b_main/2 as well, and receive {'EXIT', ...} messages. It was outlined by @vinod right before my attempt. I, instead, will try to explain some things about what is going on.

If the process is trapping exits and it comes to die, for example when someone called exit(Pid, die) or some linked process ends up itself with exit(die), then it will get the {'EXIT', ...} message in its mailbox instead of dying silently with the same reason. It is the runtime system that issues exit signals to every linked process, and one may trap it instead of dying.

The only exception to this rule is when exit(Pid, kill) call issued, then no matter whether a process is trapping exits or not, it just dies with reason kill.

So, to avoid silent death caused by external exit signal, the process must trap exits. Again, if the process wants to know why someone linked to him just died and take some efforts to recover, that process must trap exits. Every trapped exit signal appears as a message in the process mailbox.

So, there is no effect of your try ... catch exit:_ -> ... statement in the matter of trapping exits.

Generally trap_exit is considered bad practice. There is simple example that shows why:

18> self().
<0.42.0>
19> Pid = spawn_link(fun () -> process_flag(trap_exit, true), 
  Loop = fun (F) -> receive Any -> io:format("Any: ~p~n", [Any]) end, F(F) end, 
    Loop(Loop) end).
<0.58.0>
20> exit(Pid, grenade).                                         
Any: {'EXIT',<0.42.0>,grenade}
true
21> exit(Pid, grenade).
Any: {'EXIT',<0.42.0>,grenade}
true
...

As you may see some process is linked, is trapping exits and refuses to exit normally. It is unexpected and, obviously, is potentially dangerous. And it may break a chain of exits issued to a set of linked processes, since links are transitive.

There are bunch of subtle specialties which are laid out wonderfully in this book chapter.

share|improve this answer
    
I really enjoyed the explanation; @vinod's code is great but knowing what's going on helps me in my original program a lot. –  2rs2ts Apr 20 '13 at 22:44

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