Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

So in numpy arrays there is the built in function for getting the diagonal indices, but I can't seem to figure out how to get the diagonal starting from the top right rather than top left.

This is the normal code to get starting from the top left:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> array = np.arange(25).reshape(5,5)
>>> diagonal = np.diag_indices(5)
>>> array
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4],
   [ 5,  6,  7,  8,  9],
   [10, 11, 12, 13, 14],
   [15, 16, 17, 18, 19],
   [20, 21, 22, 23, 24]])
>>> array[diagonal]
array([ 0,  6, 12, 18, 24])

so what do I use if I want it to return:

array([ 4,  8, 12, 16, 20])
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is

In [47]: np.diag(np.fliplr(array))
Out[47]: array([ 4,  8, 12, 16, 20])

or

In [48]: np.diag(np.rot90(array))
Out[48]: array([ 4,  8, 12, 16, 20])

Of the two, np.diag(np.fliplr(array)) is faster:

In [50]: %timeit np.diag(np.fliplr(array))
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.29 us per loop

In [51]: %timeit np.diag(np.rot90(array))
100000 loops, best of 3: 6.09 us per loop
share|improve this answer
2  
You started the timing thing, so here's my best shot at making it fast: step = len(array) - 1; np.take(array, np.arange(step, array.size, step)) –  Jaime Apr 19 '13 at 23:32
    
@Jaime: That's great -- much faster than my solution. Perhaps we need np.arange(step, array.size-1, step) however? Please post it as a solution so I can vote it up. –  unutbu Apr 19 '13 at 23:48
    
I have Tim Peters' The Zen of Python hanging on my cube wall, just off my monitor. I cannot post the code of the comment as an answer while readability counts is looking at me... :P Your solution with fliplr is probably the best: fast enough and much, much more understandable when you revisit it a couple of months after writing it. –  Jaime Apr 19 '13 at 23:56
    
@Jaime you will always loose with those timings, because diagonal creates a view (or will in newer versions). –  seberg Apr 20 '13 at 9:23

Here are two ideas:

step = len(array) - 1

# This will make a copy
array.flat[step:-step:step]

# This will make a veiw
array.ravel()[step:-step:step]
share|improve this answer
    
The second might make a copy ;) –  seberg Apr 20 '13 at 9:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.