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I have the following hash

my %hash = (
    w1 => '0',
    e2 => '1',
    r1 => '2',
    o3 => '1',
    h4 => '0',
    t5 => '1',
);

I would like to get the number of keys that map to each value in the hash.

3 keys map to value 1.
1 key map to value 2.
2 keys map to value 0.

I would like to do this without using a function from a module.

One way I thought of doing this was looping through the values of the hash. If that value has a key then increment the counter for that key. The problem is knowing what the values are beforehand so that I can initialize counters for each value. There's probably an easier solution to this. I think regex might work.

attempt 1

my $string;
foreach my $value (value %hash) {
$string = join(",", $value);
}

# count the number of occurrences for each value (separated by commas)
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use another hash to count the occurrences.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my %hash = (
    w1 => '0',
    e2 => '1',
    r1 => '2',
    o3 => '1',
    h4 => '0',
    t5 => '1',
);

my %count;
for my $value (values %hash) {
    $count{$value}++;
}

for my $value (keys %count) {
    my $count = $count{$value};

    print "$count key", $count == 1 ? q() : 's',
          " map",       $count == 1 ? 's' : q(),
          " to $value.\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
superb, that's perfect –  cooldood3490 Apr 19 '13 at 23:20
    
can you explain the syntax in the print statement? For example, what's ? and q() and 's'? What's the : for? –  cooldood3490 Apr 19 '13 at 23:25
1  
q() is an empty string. condition ? true : false is the ternary operator, if the condition is true, it returns the true part, otherwise the false part. It handles the grammar in this case. –  choroba Apr 19 '13 at 23:30

You can loop through the hash:

my %counterhash = ();

while ( ($key, $value) = each %hash )
{
  #print "key: $key, value: $hash{$key}\n";
  $counterhash{$value}++;
}

After that, counterhash will be a hash of each value to the number of occurrences of that value

You don't have to initialize a key of each particular $value. It is undefined initially, but is interpreted as zero when incremented.

The documentation says:

The only things you need to declare in Perl are report formats and subroutines (and sometimes not even subroutines). A variable holds the undefined value ("undef") until it has been assigned a defined value, which is anything other than "undef". When used as a number, "undef" is treated as 0; when used as a string, it is treated as the empty string, ""; and when used as a reference that isn’t being assigned to, it is treated as an error.

share|improve this answer
    
that works too. can you show how you would initialize $key and $value? When I do while ( my ($key, $value) = each %hash) {...} it doesn't work for me. I get syntax errors. –  cooldood3490 Apr 19 '13 at 23:28
    
not sure, I copied it from perlhowto.com/iterate_through_a_hash, because I don't really program in perl, so am not familiar with the syntax –  ronalchn Apr 19 '13 at 23:33
    
LOL well in the end you posted a solution that works! +1, I'm sure more points are coming your way –  cooldood3490 Apr 19 '13 at 23:36

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