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I am creating a multi client chat server and i am pretty confident that it will work (Correct me if i'm wrong), I have the issue that on the socket that the client connects to is null so the connections can't be created because i use if(Socket != null) so i don't get errors but i will explain my layout real fast. The server starts with a starter class called (LaunchServer) that uses the class object ClientConnector as Minecraft and then starts the method runServer(). Here is the code for this class:

public class LaunchServer
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println("[Info] Running");
        ClientConnector Minecraft = new ClientConnector();
        Minecraft.runServer();
    }
}

It's fairly simple. This brings us to the ClientConnector class. Here we start at the method runServer(). Right away we have a try catch block. in that block we print a message that the server is trying to connect to the port 1337. we then create a new ServerSocket called serversocket. We then send a message to the console saying that we have bound to port and that we are awaiting a connection. While true, we create a new Socket socket that equals ServerSocket.accept(); OMG fuck it. Heres the code. you know what it does...

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.net.*;
import java.io.*;

public class ClientConnector
{

public static ArrayList<Socket> Connections = new ArrayList<Socket>();

public static void runServer()
{
    try
    {   
        System.out.println("[Info] Attempting to bind to port 1337.");
        @SuppressWarnings("resource")
        ServerSocket serversocket = new ServerSocket(1337);
        System.out.println("[Info] Bound to port 1337.");
        System.out.println("[Info] Waiting for client connections...");
        while(true)
        {
            Socket socket = serversocket.accept();
            new ClientHandler(socket).start();
            Connections.add(socket);
        }

    }
    catch (IOException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
}

This takes us to the handler class:

import java.io.*;
import java.net.*;


public class ClientHandler extends Thread
{
Socket Socket;

public ClientHandler(Socket socket)
{
    socket = Socket;
    System.out.println("[Info] Client connected on port 1337.");
}

public void run()
{
    while(true)
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < ClientConnector.Connections.size(); i++)
        {

            try
            {
                if(Socket != null)//This stays null...
                {
                    ObjectOutputStream Output = new //These can't be created... 
                    ObjectOutputStream(Socket.getOutputStream());
                    ObjectInputStream Input = new ObjectInputStream(Socket.getInputStream());
                    whileChatting(Input, Output);
                }
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

public static void sendMessage(String message, String returnedMessage, ObjectOutputStream out)
{
    try
    {

        if(!message.isEmpty())
        {
            out.writeObject("\247c[Server]\247d " + message);
            out.flush();
            System.out.println("[Chat] Sent: " + message);
        }
        else
        {
            out.writeObject(returnedMessage);
            System.out.println("[Chat] Sent: " + returnedMessage);
        }
        out.flush();
        System.out.println("[Info] Fluching remaining data to stream.");
        System.out.println("\n[Server] " + message);
    }
    catch(IOException ioException)
    {
        System.out.println("[Warning] Error: ioException @ sendMessage line 76.");
    }
 }

public static void whileChatting(ObjectInputStream input, ObjectOutputStream output) throws IOException
{
    String message = "";
    do
     {
         try
         {
             message = (String) input.readObject();
             System.out.println("\n" + message);
             sendMessage("", message, output); 
         }
         catch(ClassNotFoundException classNotFoundException)
         {
             System.out.println("[Warning] Error: ClassNotFoundException @ whileChatting line 1-7.");
             System.out.println("\n idk wtf that user sent!");
         }
     }while(!message.equals("/stop"));
 }


}

Read the run method. There you will see the null problem

Would the connection get accepted then passed to the hander class? How can a null connection get accepted? My question is how can i fix this problem?

share|improve this question
    
There is a typo in the variable name in class ClientHandler -- you have written Socket Socket , that is the cause of all errors. Look at the constructor, you have all messed up with variable names – Extreme Coders Apr 20 '13 at 2:20
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is you've got a logic error due to un-recommended naming conventions. You shouldn't name variables with keywords, like your Socket variable, and each variable should have a distinguishable name. e.g. not socket1, socket2 but serverSocket, clientSocket because that will make it easier for you and anyone else to read and fix your code.

Change

Socket Socket;

to

Socket connectedSocket;

and in your constructor

socket = Socket;

to

connectedSocket = socket;

then finally, in your run() method change

if(Socket != null)

to

if(connectedSocket != null)
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 - Another example of someone ignoring the Java style conventions and getting bitten. There's a lesson here ... – Stephen C Apr 20 '13 at 2:39
    
Actually the member variable should be named socket, and the constructor code should read this.socket = socket. It isn't a ServerSocket. – EJP Apr 20 '13 at 5:23
    
@EJP: Good point, I'll fix that up. Although by naming it something that wasn't just socket I was hoping to help differentiate his names. Something like connectedSocket would've been more appropriate though – TheMerovingian Apr 20 '13 at 5:27

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