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Is it possible to manipulate the record/observation/row delimiter when reading in data (i.e. read.table) from a text file? It's straightforward to adjust the field delimiter using sep="", but I haven't found a way to change the record delimiter from an end-of-line character.

I am trying to read in pipe delimited text files in which many of the entries are long strings that include carriage returns. R treats these CRs as end-of-line, which begins a new row incorrectly and screws up the number of records and field order.

I would like to use a different delimiter instead of a CR. As it turns out, each row begins with the same string, so if I could use use something like \nString to identify true end-of-line, the table would import correctly. Here's a simplified example of what one of the text files might look like.

V1,V2,V3,V4
String,A,5,some text
String,B,2,more text and
more text
String,B,7,some different text
String,A,,

Should read into R as

V1      V2       V3      V4
String  A        5       some text
String  B        2       more text and more text
String  B        7       some different text
String  A        N/A     N/A

I can open the files in a text editor and clean them with a find/replace before reading in, but a systematic solution within R would be great. Thanks for your help.

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1  
But what would you change the record delimiters too? It's not consistent and needs to be cleaned somehow. If this is all you have then you could just read it in as raw unformatted text, search through for lines that don't start with "String" and attach them to the prior line and send to read.table for formatting. But is this really all that needs to be fixed? –  John Apr 20 '13 at 2:47
    
Yes, that's probably the right way to look at it. A better way, anyway. That's basically what GG's solution is doing, right? –  Cam Apr 21 '13 at 3:21
    
yes, yes it is... –  John Apr 21 '13 at 15:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

We can read them in and collapse them afterwards. g will have the value 0 for the header, 1 for the next line (and for follow on lines, if any, that are to go with it) and so on. tapply collapses the lines according to g giving L2 and finally we re-read the lines:

Lines <- "V1,V2,V3,V4
String,A,5,some text
String,B,2,more text and
more text
String,B,7,some different text
String,A,,"

L <- readLines(textConnection(Lines))

g <- cumsum(grepl("^String", L))
L2 <- tapply(L, g, paste, collapse = " ")

DF <- read.csv(text = L2, as.is = TRUE)
DF$V4[ DF$V4 == "" ] <- NA

This gives:

> DF
      V1 V2 V3                      V4
1 String  A  5               some text
2 String  B  2 more text and more text
3 String  B  7     some different text
4 String  A NA                    <NA>
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+1 cool solution. It took me a while to work out what you did. –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 20 '13 at 5:46
    
Clever and excellent, thanks. –  Cam Apr 21 '13 at 3:19

If you're on Linux/Mac, you should really be using a command line tool, like e.g. sed, instead. Here are two slightly different approaches:

# keep the \n
read.csv(pipe('sed \'N; s/\\([^,]*\\)\\n\\([^,]*$\\)/"\\1\\n\\2"/\' test.txt'))
#      V1 V2 V3                       V4
#1 String  A  5                some text
#2 String  B  2 more text and\nmore text
#3 String  B  7      some different text
#4 String  A NA

# get rid of the \n and replace with a space
read.csv(pipe('sed \'N; s/\\([^,]*\\)\\n\\([^,]*$\\)/\\1 \\2/\' test.txt'))
#      V1 V2 V3                      V4
#1 String  A  5               some text
#2 String  B  2 more text and more text
#3 String  B  7     some different text
#4 String  A NA
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