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I am new to C/C++, but was curious to know about the issue i am seeing.

typedef union
{
   int a;
   float c;
   char b[20];
}
Union;

int main()
{
 Union y = {100};
 printf("Union y :%d - %s - %f \n",y.a,y.b,y.c);
}

And output is

 Union y :100 - d - 0.000000

My question is ...why is 'd' getting printed? I changed the order in union still the same output. but if i declare a char f[20] outside the union then nothing gets printed. I am having MacBook lion image and using xcode. THanks in advance

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I changed the order in union still the same output.

The order of the elements in a union doesn't change anything because all the elements of a union use the same piece of memory. Your code prints 100 for y.a and d for y.b because both expressions interpret the same bytes. So, for example, if you add a line that sets y.b and then prints again:

Union y = {100};
printf("Union y :%d - %s - %f \n",y.a,y.b,y.c);
y.b = 'f';
printf("Union y :%d - %s - %f \n",y.a,y.b,y.c);

you'll see that y.a and y.c. change whenever y.b changes, and vice versa. y.a should change to 102 in the second printf(), since that's the ASCII character code for 'f'.

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The ASCII code for 'd' is 100. Setting a to 100 amounts to setting b to {'d', '\0', '\0', '\0', …noise…} (on a 32-bit little-endian machine), which printf treats as "d".

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And why does c get printed as 0.0000? –  0x499602D2 Apr 20 '13 at 2:50
    
@0x499602D2: Because of the way IEEE floats are stored in memory. –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 20 '13 at 2:52
    
Also, why do you have \0, \0 and what is noise –  0x499602D2 Apr 20 '13 at 2:53
    
@0x499602D2 The size of the union is the size of its longest element, 20 bytes in your example. Setting the integer sets the first 4 bytes (on a 32-bit machine), the other 16 (noise) are left uninitialized. –  Sulthan Apr 20 '13 at 16:44
    
@Sulthan Wow thanks for clearing that up! I'm not too familiar with unions. –  0x499602D2 Apr 20 '13 at 16:50
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The following program may help you understand better:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef union
{
    int a;
    float c;
    char b[20];
}
Union;

void dump(const void* buffer, size_t length)
{
    size_t i;
    for (i = 0; i < length;) {
        printf("%.2x ", reinterpret_cast<const unsigned char*>(buffer)[i]);
        ++i;
        if (i % 16 == 0) {
            putchar('\n');
        } else if (i % 8 == 0) {
            putchar(' ');
        }
    }
    if (i % 16 != 0) {
        putchar('\n');
    }
}

int main()
{
    Union y = {100};
    printf("Union y :%d - %s - %f \n",y.a,y.b,y.c);
    printf("The content of the Union is: \n");
    dump(&y, sizeof y);
}

The output is:

Union y :100 - d - 0.000000 
The content of the Union is: 
64 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
00 00 00 00 

Effectively, the binary representation of a (which is a int) is 64 00 00 00, 100 in little-endian hexadecimal. The binary representation of b is 64 00 ..., and the 0x00 ends the string, while 0x64 is 'd'. The binary representation of c is 64 00 00 00, which in the IEEE float representation is 0.0, because the non-zero part is the exponent.

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+1 for the helpful example. However, c isn't 0.0, it's 1.401298464324817e-43 (a subnormal), which %f reports as 0.00000. The non-zero part is actually the low end of the significand, with an exponent of 0. On a big-endian architecture, you'd get 9.44473296573929e+21 thanks to the non-zero exponent. –  Marcelo Cantos Apr 20 '13 at 4:01
    
Hi Marcelo, thanks for the correction. Do you get how 1.401...e-43 comes from? I can get this number from "%g", but the minimal float should be only 1.175494351e-38F. –  Yongwei Wu Apr 21 '13 at 13:53
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