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I am new to C programming and trying to write a code for counting the number of words in a string.Here is my code for counting the number of codes.

    #include<stdio.h> 
    #include<string.h>
    void main() 
    { 
        int count=0,i,len; 
        char str[100]; 
        printf("enter the sentence"); 
        gets(str); 
        len=strlen(str); 
        for(i=0;i<=len;i++) 
        {  
           if(str[i]==' ') 
              count++; 
        } 
        printf("the number of words are :\t%d",count+1); 
    }

When my input is:Here is four words it works fine. it gives output the number of words are : 4

My question is how do I handle "two consecutive spaces" between the word, "space at the beginning" of the input and "space at the last" of the input.

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3  
Note: Do not use gets(). It is such a security hole it has been deprecated from the language and targeted for removal in the next standard. –  WhozCraig Apr 20 '13 at 2:58
    
@WhozCraig I didn't realize that; I have always used it for its simplicity. Can you point me to its replacements? –  Anurag Kalia Apr 20 '13 at 3:15
    
@WhozCraig I also use gets() all the time. Can you point out the actual defect i using it? –  Aatish Sai Apr 20 '13 at 3:32
2  
http://insecure.org/stf/smashstack.html is a great link that goes right into the nitty-gritty. Put simply, the user can input more data than your buffer (str) can hold, overrunning it - if the attacker knows how to exploit it, they can change the next instruction to be executed to that of their own choosing. –  ZXcvbnM Apr 20 '13 at 4:05
2  
The point with gets() in particular is that you have absolutely no way to limit the amount of data read. The recommended replacement is fgets() (remember that you can access standard input via the predefined FILE * stdin handle). While we're at the subject of deprecated functions, scanf() is also considered a poor choice for reading user input, due to its very limited ability to recover from matching errors. –  DevSolar Apr 20 '13 at 4:15
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8 Answers

Instead of counting spaces, count the first non-space character of each word.

#include<stdio.h> 

int main() 
{ 
    int count=0; 
    char str[100]; 
    printf("enter the sentence"); 
    gets(str);

    char *cur= str;

    for (;;)
    {
        while (*cur == ' ')
        {
            cur++;
        }

        if (*cur == 0)
        {
            break;
        }

        count++;

        while (*cur != 0 && *cur != ' ')
        {
            cur++;
        }
    }

    printf("the number of words are :\t%d",count); 

    return 0;
}
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You can use:

 while(str[i]==' '&&str[i]!=EOF) 
{
    count++;
    i++;
}

instead of your if part. You also need to add these code before the for loop to read the beginning spaces.

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I think the loop in the current form may not work properly,

It should be as follows,

    for(i=0;i<len;i++) 
    { 
          if(i!=0)
          {
             if(str[i]==' ') 
               count++; 
          }
    }  

To check the other criteria change the code as follows,

    for(i=0;i<len;i++) 
    { 
             if(str[i]==' ') 
             {  
                if(i!=0)
                {  
                   if(str[i+1]!=' ')
                   {
                      count++;
                   } 
               }   
    }  
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yeah it works fine but have to make a little change to ignore the last space in case the the input ends with the space.Any ways thank you –  Aatish Sai Apr 20 '13 at 3:01
    
Then change the for loop test to i<=n, then it will work fine –  Deepu Apr 20 '13 at 3:06
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Just ignore spaces at the beginning and spaces directly after other spaces, and +1 if there are no spaces at the last.

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <string.h>
// #include <stdlib.h>
int main() // void main is a bad practice
{ 
    int count = 0, i, len, ignoreSpace; 
    char str[100];
    printf("enter the sentence\n"); 
    gets(str); 
    len = strlen(str); 
    ignoreSpace = 1; // handle space at the beginning
    for(i = 0; i < len; i++) // not i<=len
    { 
        if(str[i] == ' '){
            if(!ignoreSpace){
                count++;
                ignoreSpace = 1; // handle two or more consecutive spaces
            }
        }else{
            ignoreSpace = 0;
        }
    }
    if( !ignoreSpace ) // handle space at the last
        count++;
    printf("the number of words are :\t%d\n", count); // +1 is moved to previous line
    // system("pause");
    return 0;
}
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Thank you this was what I was looking for. And about your comment on using int main() instead of void, me being a beginner my lecturer is teaching using void can you give me some knowledge about it or just a link where i can learn –  Aatish Sai Apr 20 '13 at 3:11
    
@AatishSai [stackoverflow.com/a/5296593/2040040 ] –  johnchen902 Apr 20 '13 at 3:14
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use strtok and first call of strtok use strtok(string," ") and for rest of calls use strtok(NULL, " \n")

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You should count the transitions from space to non-space characters + a possible non-space character in the beginning itself.

#include<stdio.h> 
#include<string.h>
int main() 
{ 
    int count=0,i,len, cur_is_spc; 
    char str[100]; 
    printf("enter the sentence"); 
    gets(str); 
    len=strlen(str);

    cur_is_spc = 0;           // 0, if current character is not space. 1, if it is.

    for(i=0; str[i]!='\0'; i++) 
    { 
       if(str[i] != ' ')
       {
           switch(cur_is_spc) // currently holding value for previous character
           {
           case 0: count++; break;    //count the spc->non-spc transitions
           case 1:          break;
           default: cout << "Erroneous value"; exit(1);
           }
           cur_is_spc = 1;    //updated for current character.
       }
       else
       {
           cur_is_spc = 0;    //updated for current character.
       }
    } 

    printf("the number of words are :\t%d",count+1); 
    return 0;
}

Here, I am checking with only spaces. But there can be characters like newline, tab etc. How would your code handle them? Hint: use isspace() function.

/moreover, the transition can be done from non-alphabet characters to alphabet characters if you decide that words are made up of alphabets only. This approach is inherently flexible to suit your needs.

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One quick way to do this is use strtok and break everything according to a predicate. This function satisfy all your requirements.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int countSpace(char* str){
int counter = 0;
char * newString;
newString= strtok (str, " "); // now the newString has the str except first word
while (newString != NULL){
    counter++; // Put counter here to ignore the newString == NULL 
                // Or just -1 from the counter on main()
    newString= strtok (NULL, " "); //Break the str in to words seperated by spaces

}
return counter;
}
void main(){
    int count=0,i,len;
    char str[100];
    printf("Enter the sentence:\n");
    fgets (str , 100 , stdin);
    count = countSpace(str);
    printf("The number of words are :\t%d\n",count);
    return 0;
}

Thank you

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Why not use strtok and bypass it altogether:

int main()
{
    int num_words = 0;
    char    str_one[] = "This string has a trailing space ";
    char    str_two[] = " This string has a preceeding space";
    char    str_three[] = "This string contains  two spaces consecutively  twice!";
    char    delim[] = " ";
    char    *ret;

    /* fgets() for user input as desired... */

    if (( ret = strtok(str_one, delim)) != NULL )
    {
        while ( ret )
        {
            num_words++;
            ret = strtok(NULL, delim);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        /* no spaces, but might contain a word if the string isn't empty */
        if ( str_one[0] != '\0' )
            num_words = 1;
    }

    printf("str_one contains %i words\n", num_words);
    num_words = 0;

    ...

    return 0;
}

And by the way: main should ALWAYS return!!!

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