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I have a .txt file in which each line is only one element. As the subject suggests, I'd like to input the first row from the .txt. Then, I'd like to remove it from the .txt file as soon as I've inputted it. At the same time, I'd like to then slide each element up by one row such that the former second row element becomes the new first row.

I'm not quite sure how to proceed beyond: open( my $l, '<', 'Input.txt' ) or die "Can not open Input.txt: $!";

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Given your question and some of your comments, it looks like you might be well served learning a little bit about Perl too. I recommend the excellent (and free electronically!) Modern Perl Book. –  Joel Berger Apr 20 '13 at 21:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
use strict;

if ($#ARGV)
{
    print "\nUsage: test.pl Filename\n\n";
    exit();
}

my $f;
if (open($f, $ARGV[0]))
{
    print scalar(<$f>);

    my $s = join('', <$f>);
    close($f);

    if (open($f, '>', $ARGV[0]))
    {
        print $f $s;
        close($f);
    }
}
else print "\nCan't open input file $ARGV[0]\n\n";

or sub

sub slideFile($)
{
    my $filename = shift();

    my $f;
    if (open($f, $filename))
    {
        <$f>;

        my $s = join('', <$f>);
        close($f);

        if (open($f, '>', $filename))
        {
            print $f $s;
            close($f);
        }
    }
}
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is ARGV the name of the .txt ? –  user1690130 Apr 20 '13 at 3:16
    
You pass filename in command line... like test.pl test.txt –  Jack Apr 20 '13 at 3:17
    
why didn't you need the line that the OP had: open( my $l, '<', 'Input.txt' ) or die "Can not open Input.txt: $!" –  user1690130 Apr 20 '13 at 7:05
    
Ok, i just added last line for you. –  Jack Apr 20 '13 at 12:17
    
Thank you so much for this!! I really appreciate your help. It is not clear to me either what the name of the .txt is. So what exactly should I save my .txt as? –  paso Apr 20 '13 at 18:59

You can't remove from a file. You can simply read every byte that follows and write them back at the earlier position. This is expensive, but easy to do with Tie::File.

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Sounds interesting! How would Tie::File work? –  user1690130 Apr 20 '13 at 3:00
    
Like I said, it will copy the entire contents of the file earlier into the file every time you remove the current first line. (It use a cache in memory to speed things up.) –  ikegami Apr 20 '13 at 3:02
    
Do you have an example? How straight forward is it to apply Tie::File to the problem at hand? –  user1690130 Apr 20 '13 at 3:08
    
You're asking me how to remove the first element of an array? shift(@tied); –  ikegami Apr 20 '13 at 3:08
1  
Implement what? It's just shift(@tied);. Did you even look up Tie::File??? –  ikegami Apr 20 '13 at 20:09

When you use Tie::File, you can tie a file to an @array so that each element in the array corresponds to a line in the file.

In the following example, the shift operator removes the first element from @lines and assigns it to $first_line. Since @lines is tied to file.txt the first row in that file is also removed.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::File;

tie my @lines, 'Tie::File', 'file.txt' or die $!;

my $first_line = shift @lines;

print "first line WAS: $first_line\n";

untie @lines;
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Here's another option:

use strict;
use warnings;
use File::Slurp;

my $i = 0;
write_file $ARGV[0], grep $i++, read_file $ARGV[0];

Usage: perl script.pl inFile

The script uses File::Slurp in list context, and grep which allows the lines to pass only if $i isn't zero, so the first line is omitted, and lines 2 .. n are written back to the file.

Hope this helps!

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