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For example...

public function processRowSet($rowSet, $singleRow = false){
    $resultArray = array();
    while($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($rowSet)){
        array_push($resultArray, $row);
    };

    if ($singleRow === true){
        return $resultArray[0];
    };

    return $resultArray;
}
...and then the next line continues without an issue

When I was first starting with OOP PHP, I made the error of putting a semicolon at the end and it took me about an hour to figure out what was wrong.

Thanks for your help!

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closed as not constructive by EJP, cryptic ツ, thaJeztah, Cole Johnson, Kirk Apr 21 '13 at 0:06

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6  
Um, the whiles and ifs don't need semicolons either. –  BoltClock Apr 20 '13 at 3:08
    
I'm not sure where you would have seen semi colons there in any example or tutorial. As bolt said - same for if and while. I can't believe it works at all –  Kai Qing Apr 20 '13 at 3:10
    
there is function keyword for identifying that line theny why need another?? –  Arun Killu Apr 20 '13 at 3:26
    
It works because a semicolon on its own is considered a Null Statement (do nothing). That's why a common mistake is to write a loop like: for ($a=0; $a=10; $a++); print $a; The semicolon after the loop is the do-nothing command that it will execute 10 times. –  diamondsea Apr 20 '13 at 3:27

4 Answers 4

Why?

Because the author/s of the PHP programming language designed the language as so..

When you create some code in php the following process happens:

  1. A pre-parser parses your file, looking for syntax errors.
  2. A post-parser parses your file, looking for runtime errors.
  3. The content of the file is changed into assembler code.
  4. The assembler code changes into machine code, which then runs your program.

The authors of the programming language made the parser allow semi-colon after statements, that's WHY you're allowed to do so. (They use the brackets instead).

Some programming languages require you to use a semi-colon because the parsing process can be very difficult to implement.

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The difference is between statements and expressions:

  • If-statements, while-statements, functions, and so on are statements which do not need to be semicolon-terminated.
  • Actual commands are expressions (i.e $foo = bar()). Standalone expressions require semicolons, probably since they don't have braces to signify expression ends.

PHP borrows this syntax from C.

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To summarize, you never need a semicolon after a block-closing brace. Your code should look like this:

public function processRowSet($rowSet, $singleRow = false){
    $resultArray = array();
    while($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($rowSet)){
        array_push($resultArray, $row);
    }

    if ($singleRow === true){
        return $resultArray[0];
    }

    return $resultArray;
}

A semicolon on its own is considered a Null Statement (do nothing). That's why a common mistake is to write a loop like:

for ($a=0; $a=10; $a++); 
    print $a; 

The semicolon after the loop is the do-nothing command that it will execute (nothing) 10 times and then print out an "11". This is equivalent to writing:

for ($a=0; $a=10; $a++) {
    ; // do nothing
}
print $a; 
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Many programming language does not require a end of statement ie. ';' after a function block, or any other type of block statements like if, for, while . We do not define end of block by terminator as blocks are already confined in {}. Its due to how the code is being executed by the language parser/compiler.

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