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When using Array#shuffle, Ruby allows the use of a custom randomizer and even provides class Random to utilize it. The following example uses the class with a seed value of 48.

array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
array.shuffle(random: Random.new(48))  # => [8,6,3,7,10,9,5,2,4,1] 

I wrote a small monobit test to see how many times a value appeared first in the shuffled array.

deck = (1..10).to_a
counts = Hash.new(0)

rng = Random.new

50000.times do
  counts[deck.shuffle(random: rng).first] += 1
end

1.upto(10) do |card|
  puts "#{card}:\t#{counts[card]}"
end

The output looks similar to the following:

1:  4942
2:  5100
3:  4938
4:  4960
5:  5024
6:  4992
7:  5184
8:  4930
9:  4916
10: 5014

Suppose I want to replace the pseudo-random number generator with a new class. Since Array#shuffle appears to use Random#rand in the above example, it would seem straightforward to implement a new class to act as the RNG for shuffling. Here, I implement a new pseudo-random number generator that actually is just a very simple wrapper around rand:

deck = (1..10).to_a
counts = Hash.new(0)

class FooRandom
  def rand(max=nil)
    max.nil? ? Kernel::rand : Kernel::rand(max)
  end
end

rng = FooRandom.new

50000.times do
  counts[deck.shuffle(random: rng).first] += 1
end

1.upto(10) do |card|
  puts "#{card}:\t#{counts[card]}"
end

This, however, does not operate as expected. FooRandom#rand is called, but the shuffling produces the following distribution:

1:  0
2:  5423
3:  5562
4:  5544
5:  5512
6:  5569
7:  5535
8:  5595
9:  5524
10: 5736

As you can see, the array value 1 never appears in the first position of the array after the array is shuffled. Anyone have an idea why?

share|improve this question
    
In ruby-1.9.3-p392 I got the expected distribution with both examples. But in Ruby-2.0.0-p0 I see the same results as you. –  Shawn Balestracci Apr 20 '13 at 7:07
    
Thank you, Shawn. Yeah, I am using ruby-2.0.0-p0. –  Thai Doan Apr 20 '13 at 8:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is a bug in Ruby 2.0.0p0 where the limit is off by one.

This has been fixed in Ruby 2.0.0p195, so you should upgrade your installation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for posting that (and reporting the bug.) I suspected it might be a bug and was going to look into that today. –  Shawn Balestracci Apr 20 '13 at 17:21

In ruby 1.9.3 max is nil. In Ruby 2.0.0 max is passed to rand. I was able to get it to work by changing the rand method to the following.

class FooRandom
  def rand(max=nil)
    max.nil? ? Kernel::rand : Kernel::rand(max+1)
  end
end

It was off by one before.

Here's an excerpt of the C source from http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/Array.html#method-i-shuffle

i = RARRAY_LEN(ary);
ptr = RARRAY_PTR(ary);
while (i) {
    long j = RAND_UPTO(i);
    VALUE tmp;
    tmp = ptr[--i];
    ptr[i] = ptr[j];
    ptr[j] = tmp;
}
return ary;

}

share|improve this answer
    
Shawn, that works great! I wonder if the change made to rand from 1.9.3. to 2.0.0 was intentional or perhaps a bug? –  Thai Doan Apr 20 '13 at 16:38
    
@ThaiDoan: It's a bug, see my answer. –  Marc-André Lafortune Apr 20 '13 at 16:44

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