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Does C++ support 'finally' blocks?

What is the RAII idiom?

What is the difference between C++'s RAII idiom and C#'s 'using' statement?

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7 Answers

No, C++ does not support 'finally' blocks. The reason is that C++ instead supports RAII: "Resource Acquisition Is Initialization" -- a poor name for a really useful concept.

The idea is that an object's destructor is responsible for freeing resources. When the object has automatic storage duration, the object's destructor will be called when the block in which it was created exits -- even when that block is exited in the presence of an exception. Here is Bjarne Stroustrup's explanation of the topic.

A common use for RAII is locking a mutex:

// A class with implements RAII
class lock
{
    mutex &m_;

public:
    lock(mutex &m)
      : m_(m)
    {
        m.acquire();
    }
    ~lock()
    {
        m_.release();
    }
};

// A class which uses 'mutex' and 'lock' objects
class foo
{
    mutex mutex_; // mutex for locking 'foo' object
public:
    void bar()
    {
        lock scopeLock(mutex_); // lock object.

        foobar(); // an operation which may throw an exception

        // scopeLock will be destructed even if an exception
        // occurs, which will release the mutex and allow
        // other functions to lock the object and run.
    }
};

RAII also simplifies using objects in as members of other classes. When the owning class' is destructed, the resource managed by the RAII class gets released because the destructor for the RAII-managed class gets called as a result. This means that when you use RAII for all members in a class that manage resources, you can get away with a using a very simple, maybe even the default, destructor for the owner class since it doesn't need to manually manage its member resource lifetimes. (Thanks to Mike B for pointing this out.)

For those familliar with C# or VB.NET, you may recognize that RAII is similar to .NET deterministic destruction using IDisposable and 'using' statements. Indeed, the two methods are very similar. The main difference is that RAII will deterministically release any type of resource -- including memory. When implementing IDisposable in .NET (even the .NET language C++/CLI), resources will be deterministically released except for memory. In .NET, memory is not be deterministically released; memory is only released during garbage collection cycles.

 

† Some people believe that "Destruction is Resource Relinquishment" is a more accurate name for the RAII idiom.

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8  
"Destruction is Resource Relinquishment" - DIRR... Nope, doesn't work for me. =P –  Erik Forbes Oct 2 '08 at 7:37
2  
RAII is stuck -- there's really no changing it. Trying to do so would be foolish. However, you have to admit though that "Resource Acquisition Is Initialization" is still a pretty poor name. –  Kevin Oct 2 '08 at 7:44
56  
SBRM == Scope Bound Resource Management –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 24 '08 at 21:54
3  
Anyone with the skill to engineer not only software generally, let alone improved techniques, can give no worthy excuse for such a horrendous acronym. –  Hardryv Apr 9 '12 at 20:47
9  
This leaves you stuck when you have something to clean up that doesn't match any C++ object's lifetime. I guess you end up with Lifetime Equals C++ Class Liftime Or Else It Gets Ugly (LECCLEOEIGU?). –  Warren P Dec 27 '12 at 16:16
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In C++ the finally is NOT required because of RAII.

RAII moves the responsibility of exception safety from the user of the object to the designer (and implementer) of the object. I would argue this is the correct place as you then only need to get exception safety correct once (in the design/implementation). By using finally you need to get exception safety correct every time you use an object.

Also IMO the code looks neater (see below).

Example:

A database object. To make sure the DB connection is used it must be opened and closed. By using RAII this can be done in the constructor/destructor.

C++ Like RAII

void someFunc()
{
    DB    db("DBDesciptionString");
    // Use the db object.

} // db goes out of scope and destructor closes the connection.
  // This happens even in the presence of exceptions.

The use of RAII makes using a DB object correctly very easy. The DB object will correctly close itself by the use of a destructor no matter how we try and abuse it.

Java Like Finally

void someFunc()
{
    DB      db = new DB("DBDesciptionString");
    try
    {
        // Use the db object.
    }
    finally
    {
        // Can not rely on finaliser.
        // So we must explicitly close the connection.
        try
        {
            db.close();
        }
        catch(Throwable e)
        {
           /* Ignore */
           // Make sure not to throw exception if one is already propagating.
        }
    }
}

When using finally the correct use of the object is delegated to the user of the object. i.e. It is the responsibility of the object user to correctly to explicitly close the DB connection. Now you could argue that this can be done in the finaliser, but resources may have limited availability or other constraints and thus you generally do want to control the release of the object and not rely on the non deterministic behavior of the garbage collector.

Also this is a simple example.
When you have multiple resources that need to be released the code can get complicated.

A more detailed analysis can be found here: http://accu.org/index.php/journals/236

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Exactly. <54321moretogo> –  phresnel Jul 6 '12 at 11:43
1  
// Make sure not to throw exception if one is already propagating. It is important for C++ destructors not to throw exceptions as well for this very reason. –  Cemafor May 23 '13 at 21:28
    
@Cemafor: The reason for C++ not to throw exceptions out of the destructor is different than Java. In Java it will work (you just loose the original exception). In C++ its really bad. But the point in C++ is that you only have to do it once (by the designer of the class) when he writes the destructor. In Java you have to do it at the point of usage. So it is the responsibility of the user of the class to write the same boiler plate very time. –  Loki Astari May 24 '13 at 0:31
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Beyond making clean up easy with stack-based objects, RAII is also useful because the same 'automatic' clean up occurs when the object is a member of another class. When the owning class is destructed, the resource managed by the RAII class gets cleaned up because the dtor for that class gets called as a result.

This means that when you reach RAII nirvana and all members in a class use RAII (like smart pointers), you can get away with a very simple (maybe even default) dtor for the owner class since it doesn't need to manually manage its member resource lifetimes.

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That's a very good point. +1 to you. Not many other people have voted you up though. I hope you don't mind that I edited my post to include your comments. (I gave you credit of course.) Thanks! :) –  Kevin Oct 2 '08 at 16:22
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why is it that even managed languages provide a finally-block despite resources being deallocated automatically by the garbage collector anyway?

Actually, languages based on Garbage collectors need "finally" more. A garbage collector does not destroy your objects in a timely manner, so it can not be relied upon to clean up non-memory related issues correctly.

In terms of dynamically-allocated data, many would argue that you should be using smart-pointers.

However...

RAII moves the responsibility of exception safety from the user of the object to the designer

Sadly this is its own downfall. Old C programming habits die hard. When you're using a library written in C or a very C style, RAII won't have been used. Short of re-writing the entire API front-end, that's just what you have to work with. Then the lack of "finally" really bites.

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5  
Exactly... RAII seems nice from an ideal perspective. But I have to work with conventional C APIs all the time (like C-style functions in Win32 API...). It's very common to acquire a resource that returns some kind of a HANDLE, which then requires some function like CloseHandle(HANDLE) to clean up. Using try ... finally is a nice way of dealing with possible exceptions. (Thankfully, it looks like shared_ptr with custom deleters and C++11 lambdas should provide some RAII-based relief that doesn't require writing entire classes to wrap some API I only use in one place.). –  James Johnston Oct 3 '11 at 18:37
5  
@JamesJohnston, it's very easy to write a wrapper class that holds any kind of handle and provides RAII mechanics. ATL provides a bunch of them for example. It seems that you consider this to be too much trouble but I disagree, they're very small and easy to write. –  Mark Ransom Jan 4 '12 at 3:06
2  
Simple yes, small no. Size is dependent on the complexity of the library you're working with. –  couling Jan 4 '12 at 14:20
    
@MarkRansom: Is there any mechanism via which RAII can do something intelligent if an exception occurs during cleanup while another exception is pending? In systems with try/finally, it's possible--though awkward--to arrange things so that the pending exception and the exception that occurred during cleanup both get stored in a new CleanupFailedException. Is there any plausible way to achieve such a result using RAII? –  supercat Nov 30 '12 at 22:36
2  
@couling: There are many cases where a program will call a SomeObject.DoSomething() method and want to know whether it (1) succeeded, (2) failed with no side-effects, (3) failed with side-effects the caller is prepared to cope with, or (4) failed with side-effects the caller cannot cope with. Only the caller is going to know what situations it can and cannot cope with; what the caller needs is a way of knowing what the situation is. It's too bad there's no standard mechanism for supplying the most important information about an exception. –  supercat Dec 3 '12 at 20:43
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Sorry for digging up such an old thread, but there is a major error in the following reasoning:

RAII moves the responsibility of exception safety from the user of the object to the designer (and implementer) of the object. I would argue this is the correct place as you then only need to get exception safety correct once (in the design/implementation). By using finally you need to get exception safety correct every time you use an object.

More often than not, you have to deal with dynamically allocated objects, dynamic numbers of objects etc. Within the try-block, some code might create many objects (how many is determined at runtime) and store pointers to them in a list. Now, this is not an exotic scenario, but very common. In this case, you'd want to write stuff like

void DoStuff(vector<string> input)
{
  list<Foo*> myList;

  try
  {    
    for (int i = 0; i < input.size(); ++i)
    {
      Foo* tmp = new Foo(input[i]);
      if (!tmp)
        throw;

      myList.push_back(tmp);
    }

    DoSomeStuff(myList);
  }
  finally
  {
    while (!myList.empty())
    {
      delete myList.back();
      myList.pop_back();
    }
  }
}

Of course the list itself will be destroyed when going out of scope, but that wouldn't clean up the temporary objects you have created.

Instead, you have to go the ugly route:

void DoStuff(vector<string> input)
{
  list<Foo*> myList;

  try
  {    
    for (int i = 0; i < input.size(); ++i)
    {
      Foo* tmp = new Foo(input[i]);
      if (!tmp)
        throw;

      myList.push_back(tmp);
    }

    DoSomeStuff(myList);
  }
  catch(...)
  {
  }

  while (!myList.empty())
  {
    delete myList.back();
    myList.pop_back();
  }
}

Also: why is it that even managed lanuages provide a finally-block despite resources being deallocated automatically by the garbage collector anyway?

Hint: there's more you can do with "finally" than just memory deallocation.

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10  
Managed languages need finally-blocks precisely because only one kind of resource is automatically managed: memory. RAII means that all resources can be handled in the same way, so no need for finally. If you actually used RAII in your example (by using smart pointers in your list instead of naked ones), the code would be simpler than your "finally"-example. And even simpler if you don't check the return value of new - checking it is pretty much pointless. –  Myto Jun 2 '10 at 14:59
2  
new doesn't return NULL, it throws an exception instead –  Hasturkun Jun 2 '10 at 15:07
3  
You raise an important question, but it does have 2 possible answers. One is that given by Myto -- use smart pointers for all dynamic allocations. The other is to use standard containers, which always destroy their contents upon destruction. Either way, every allocated object is ultimately owned by a statically allocated object which automatically frees it upon destruction. It's a real shame that these better solutions are hard for programmers to discover because of the high visibility of plain pointers and arrays. –  j_random_hacker Jun 4 '10 at 2:53
1  
C++11 improves this and includes std::shared_ptr and std::unique_ptr directly in the stdlib. –  u0b34a0f6ae Oct 19 '11 at 21:33
6  
The reason your example is so horrid looking isn't because RAII is flawed, rather it is because you failed to use it. Raw pointers are not RAII. –  Ben Voigt Apr 27 '13 at 22:18
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FWIW, Microsoft Visual C++ does support try,finally and it has historically been used in MFC apps as a method of catching serious exceptions that would otherwise result in a crash. For example;

int CMyApp::Run() 
{
    __try
    {
    	int	i = CWinApp::Run();
    	m_Exitok = MAGIC_EXIT_NO;
    	return i;
    }
    __finally
    {
    	if (m_Exitok != MAGIC_EXIT_NO)
    		FaultHandler();
    }
}

I've used this in the past to do things like save backups of open files prior to exit. Certain JIT debugging settings will break this mechanism though.

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2  
bear in mind that's not really C++ exceptions, but SEH ones. You can use both in MS C++ code. SEH is an OS exception handler that is the way VB, .NET implement exceptions. –  gbjbaanb Oct 4 '08 at 23:13
    
and you can use SetUnhandledExceptionHandler to create a 'global' un-catched exception handler - for SEH exceptions. –  gbjbaanb Oct 4 '08 at 23:14
    
SEH is horrible and also prevents C++ destructors from being called –  paulm Jun 24 '13 at 10:30
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try
{
  ...
  goto finally;
}
catch(...)
{
  ...
  goto finally;
}
finally:
{
  ...
}
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21  
Cute idiom, but its not quite the same. returning in the try block or catch won't pass through your 'finally:' code. –  Edward Kmett Apr 23 '10 at 19:48
2  
It's worth keeping this wrong answer (with 0 rating), since Edward Kmett brings up a very important distinction. –  Mark Lakata Dec 4 '12 at 7:21
4  
Even bigger flaw (IMO): This code eats all exceptions, which finally does not do. –  Ben Voigt Apr 27 '13 at 22:19
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