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FILE:

hello

world

foo

bar

How can when remove all the empty new lines in this FILE?

Output of command:

FILE:

hello
world
foo
bar
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5 Answers 5

up vote 34 down vote accepted

grep . FILE


(And if you really want to do it in sed, then: sed -e /^$/d FILE)

(And if you really want to do it in awk, then: awk /./ FILE)

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1  
as simple as it gets –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 23 '09 at 7:10
1  
Sweet! TY for the other commands as well - but looks like grep is my new best friend. –  user191960 Oct 23 '09 at 7:15
    
grep . FILE doesn't work for me. It's probably better to stick with grep for searching file contents, and sed for editing file contents. –  Michael Dillon Oct 23 '09 at 8:27
3  
sed -ne/./p works too, and awk /./ is shorter (action is {print} if left unspecified). @ghostdog74: grep '[^[:space:]]' then. –  ephemient Oct 23 '09 at 16:33
1  
For those that don't understand, the . is a regular expression that matches any character except for newline. –  wisbucky Jan 24 at 5:40
with awk, just check for number of fields. no need regex

$ more file
hello

world

foo

bar

$ awk 'NF' file
hello
world
foo
bar
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Doesn't need quotes. This trick is found in awk1line.txt -- then again, so are most awk tricks :) –  ephemient Oct 23 '09 at 16:35
1  
its just my good practice to put quotes, since you are running it from shell.. for composite awk statements, you still have to put quotes. so why not cultivate this habit. –  ghostdog74 Oct 23 '09 at 23:59

Or   grep -v -e '^$'

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this has the same effect as grep . FILE in that a space as a blank line will get grabbed. –  ghostdog74 Oct 23 '09 at 10:27
    
"grep" looks for any line that matches the pattern. "." matches any character. "grep . FILE" matches any line with at least 1 character. Whereas "grep -v" excludes lines matching the pattern. OP said "remove all the empty new lines". If you want to exclude lines with just spaces, "grep -v '^ $'". The "" will match zero or more of the preceding pattern, in this case a space. Though you might prefer to match and exclude other whitespace characters (tabs, form-feeds, etc) too. –  Mr.Ree Oct 23 '09 at 23:44
    
BTW: "^" matches beginning of line. "$" matches the end of line. –  Mr.Ree Oct 23 '09 at 23:45
1  
This method allowed me to combine multiple excludes more easily than just "grep . FILE". For example, I was looking at a conf file and wanted to exclude all commented lines and all empty lines. So I used "grep -v -e '#' -e '^$' squid.conf". Worked a treat. –  BenK Mar 6 '12 at 13:57
1  
this one is a lot faster than the 'grep . FILE'. This is due to the more complex tasks of verifying the regex '.' than excluding as soon as ^$ does not matches. –  Édouard Lopez Sep 5 '12 at 11:14

grep '^..' my_file

example

THIS

IS

THE

FILE

EOF_MYFILE

it gives as output only lines with at least 2 characters.

THIS
IS
THE
FILE
EOF_MYFILE

See also the results with grep '^' my_file outputs

THIS

IS

THE

FILE

EOF_MYFILE

and also with grep '^.' my_file outputs

THIS
IS
THE
FILE
EOF_MYFILE
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Try this: sed -i '/^[ \t]*$/d' file-name

It will delete all blank lines having any no. of white spaces (spaces or tabs) i.e. (0 or more) in the file.

Note: there is a 'space' followed by '\t' inside the square bracket.

The modifier -i will force to write the updated contents back in the file. Without this flag you can see the empty lines got deleted on the screen but the actual file will not be affected.

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