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I often find myself with an Option[T] for some type T and wish to test the value of the option against some value. For example:

val opt = Some("oxbow")
if (opt.isDefined && opt.get == "lakes") 
   //do something

The following code is equivalent and removes the requirement to test the existence of the value of the option

if (opt.map(_ == "lakes").getOrElse(false))
 //do something

However this seems less readable to me. Other possibilities are:

if (opt.filter(_ == "lakes").isDefined)

if (opt.find(_ == "lakes").isDefined) //uses implicit conversion to Iterable

But I don't think these clearly express the intent either which would be better as:

if (opt.isDefinedAnd(_ == "lakes"))

Has anyone got a better way of doing this test?

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5 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

How about

if (opt == Some("lakes"))

This expresses the intent clearly and is straight forward.

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1  
Duh! Sometimes I can be extremely stupid –  oxbow_lakes Oct 23 '09 at 8:29
    
Well, it happens to me all the time ;-) –  Walter Chang Oct 23 '09 at 8:57
    
Sometimes the simplest solution is the best :) –  Ula Krukar Oct 23 '09 at 10:49
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Walter Chang FTW, but here's another awkward alternative:

Some(2) exists (_ == 2)
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Daniel, that is awful! :-) –  oxbow_lakes Oct 23 '09 at 14:35
1  
This is actually the standard way as far as I'm concerned. –  extempore Oct 26 '09 at 23:54
2  
It's a slight pity that Option doesn't implicitly convert to Seq, which would allow for Some(1) contains 1. –  retronym Jan 16 '10 at 20:58
2  
Perhaps contains should be added to Option directly. –  retronym Jan 17 '10 at 9:32
2  
And it will be in 2.11! Ahh, mySeq filterNot myOption.contains... –  schmmd Mar 15 '13 at 16:29
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val opt = Some("oxbow")
opt match {
  case Some("lakes") => //Doing something
  case _ => //If it doesn't match
}
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You can use for-comprehension as well:

for {val v <- opt if v == "lakes"}
  // do smth with v
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I think pattern matching could also be used. That way you extract the interesting value directly:

val opt = Some("oxbow")
opt match {
  case Some(value) => println(value) //Doing something
}
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This does not test against the value - only that it is present. The reason I want to avoid a match is that this consequently results in the else logic residing in multiple places (i.e. the case None and if the value is not the desired one) –  oxbow_lakes Oct 23 '09 at 15:34
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