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I've written program which performs various operations on a binary tree. At the beginning I set null root pointer, then call a couple of insert() functions that add new nodes to the tree.

Finally, I call search() function that finds requested structure node and returns it.


insert() function takes two parameters - reference to the root pointer, and constant int key, which will be converted to the node structure and added to the tree

search() function takes "constant root pointer" - not reference, because I want to operate on local pointer directly, and I don't want this to be changed. The other argument it takes is int key.


This is the whole program:

#include <iostream>

struct node
{
    node *p; // parent
    node *left, *right;
    int key;
};

void insert(node *&root, const int key)
{
    node newElement = {};
    newElement.key = key;

    node *y = NULL;
    while(root)
    {
        if(key == root->key) exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        y = root;
        root = (key < root->key) ? root->left : root->right;
    }

    newElement.p = y;

    if(!y) root = &newElement;
    else if(key < y->key) y->left = &newElement;
    else y->right = &newElement;
}

node* search(const node *root, const int key)
{
    while( (root) && (root->key != key) )
        root = (key < root->key) ? root->left : root->right;

    return root;
}

int main()
{
    using namespace std;
    node *root = NULL;
    insert(root, 5);
    insert(root, 2);

    cout << search(root, 5)->key << endl;
    return 0;
}


My question is - Why doesn't search function work? It displays an error - return value type does not match the function type. But I return the poiner, just like it says in the declaration!

Also, is "const" keyword here o.k.?

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2  
Well, root is const node*, and your return value is node*. It should be changed to const node*. –  juanchopanza Apr 20 '13 at 9:49
    
@hyde done..... –  juanchopanza Apr 20 '13 at 9:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

root is const node*, and your return value is node*. It should be changed to const node*.

const node* search(const node *root, const int key);

If you need a search function to give you back a non-const node, then it needs to take a non-const node parameter. You can provide an overload to allow for both possibilities

node* search(node *root, const int key);
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I think OP needs to be able to modify the found item, so two overloads is probably a good idea, one const and one non-const. –  hyde Apr 20 '13 at 9:54
    
@hyde good point. Edited. –  juanchopanza Apr 20 '13 at 9:58

Since you are returning the same pointer you cannot have a const argument and a non-const return. Instead write two versions, one const and one non-const.

This is one of the few cases where const_cast is justified. Write two versions of your search function, one can call the other using const_cast.

const node* search(const node *root, const int key)
{
    while( (root) && (root->key != key) )
        root = (key < root->key) ? root->left : root->right;

    return root;
}

node* search(node *root, const int key)
{
    return const_cast<node *>(search(const_cast<const node *>(root), key));
}
share|improve this answer

Inside search, the variable root is a const node*. However, you're trying to return it as a node*. You can't do this because it would violate const-correctness. If you returned a pointer to a genuinely const object, the client would be able to then modify that object.

Instead, you'll need to make the function return a const node*. Either that, or root should just be a node*.

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