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I'm breaking my head here. I have this simple code :

function myFunc()
{
    this.a = "aaa";

    return {
        h: function ()
        {
                   alert(this.a);
        }
    }
}



var f = new myFunc();
console.log(f.h.apply(f)) //I'm expecting to see here : "aaa" but it says "undefined"

f.h look exactly like this :

 function ()
 {
      alert(this.a);
     } 

And so , i'm trying to set context to f itself (which contains the a prop) via apply.

But it doesn't work.

What am I missing ?

p.s. there are other alternatives. I know. but why my specific code doesn't work ?

share|improve this question
3  
You're returning an object from "myFunc" but add the property a to the function "myFunc" itself rather than to this returned object. Do console.log(f); and you'll see that f does not have a property a. –  Niko Apr 20 '13 at 12:10
    
@Niko I guess I was trying to get the benefit from both worlds. Object and to return closure ( for not exsposing all fields)....I guess it doesnt work. –  Royi Namir Apr 20 '13 at 12:11
    
why do you want to return an object from the constructor –  Arun P Johny Apr 20 '13 at 12:11
    
@ArunPJohny read my prev comment. :) thanks. –  Royi Namir Apr 20 '13 at 12:12
    
@RoyiNamir Make a a local variable (i.e., var a = "aaa";) if you'd like to have private members. –  Niko Apr 20 '13 at 12:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

f does not contain a, since you return an arbitrary object that 'overwrites' the default object that would otherwise have been returned, and that would have contained a.

If you used

function myFunc() {
  return {
    a:"aaa",
    h:function() { alert this.a; }
  }
}

then it would work!

If you want to use 'private' and 'public' variables then make it like this

function myFunc() {
  var a = "aaa";
  return {
    h:function() { alert a; }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to use closure, create a as a local variable. This will make a as a private property which outside world will not be able to access directly

function myFunc(){
    var a = "aaa";

    return {
        h: function ()   {
            alert(a);
        }
    }
}

var f = new myFunc();
console.log(f.h(f))

Demo: Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
what about this situation where the function is outside ? jsbin.com/ofucac/4/edit –  Royi Namir Apr 20 '13 at 13:07
    
it will not work because a is not available outside myFunc, it is accessible via only closure –  Arun P Johny Apr 20 '13 at 13:13
    
in that case you need a instance variable as mentioned in the accepted answer, then you can pass this to s and in s you can access a via the param.a –  Arun P Johny Apr 20 '13 at 13:14
    
@RoyiNamir checkout jsfiddle.net/arunpjohny/44ZKZ/4 –  Arun P Johny Apr 20 '13 at 13:16
    
Thank you very much my friend. :-) –  Royi Namir Apr 20 '13 at 14:19

When you are returning an object from the function you are getting that object instead of the object that was created by the ˋnewˋ keyword. The object where you put the ˋaˋ property doesn't exit any more.

Put the method in the object that is created instead of creating a different object:

function myFunc() {
  this.a = "aaa";

  this.h = function () {
    alert(this.a);
  }
}

Now the object contains the property, so you don't need to use apply to get the right context:

var f = new myFunc();
console.log(f.h())
share|improve this answer

First, keep track of how you're returning and printing items. You're attempting to use both alert and console.log for this job when you should be only using one. In addition, you're attempting to console.log the return value of a function that doesn't return anything. For my example below, I chose to use console.log and kept the function returning nothing. Below, I fixed this first problem:

function myFunc() {
    this.a = "aaa";
    return {h: function () {console.log(this.a);}}
}

var f = new myFunc();
f.h.apply(f);

Now onto the real problem. this.a returns undefined because this is bound to different two different things (first an instance of myFunc, and then f) the two times you use it in your code. You can use console.log(this) to verify this.

To solve this problem, bind a variable (let's call it self) to this so that you can reference it later. In JavaScript, inner functions have access to variables bound in outer functions. (This is called closure.) This allows us to use self in the following way:

function myFunc() {
    var self = this;
    this.a = "aaa";
    return {h: function() {console.log(self.a);}}
}

var f = new myFunc();
// f.h.apply(f); // replaced by next line; see first comment
f.h();

This prints the line aaa to the console.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. p.s.- like my answer to bangerang , the apply in your sample is redundant. cause you're keeping the context. and so-- your code can be changed to f.h() - without the apply –  Royi Namir Apr 20 '13 at 12:29
    
Ooh, didn't see the other answers until after I posted. Fixed! –  interestinglythere Apr 20 '13 at 12:33

You are losing scope with the closure, try this:

function myFunc()
{
    this.a = "aaa";
    that = this;
    return {
        h: function ()
        {
                   alert(that.a);
        }
    }
}



var f = new myFunc();
console.log(f.h.apply(f)) 
share|improve this answer
    
in your solution I can do only console.log(f.h()) we dont need apply here –  Royi Namir Apr 20 '13 at 12:15
    
what are you talking about? console.log(f.h.apply(f)) works here as well –  bangerang Apr 20 '13 at 12:20
    
correct. but it is redundant - since you keep the this ref.(that) –  Royi Namir Apr 20 '13 at 12:20
    
Ok now I hear ya! :) –  bangerang Apr 20 '13 at 12:22

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