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I am creating a heatmap to be used in a publication. The publication is restricted to black and white printing, so I'm creating the heatmap in grayscale. The problem I have is that there are some squares in the heatmap which are "Not Applicable" which I want to visually differentiate from the other cells. My understanding is that this may(?) be possible using numpy's masked arrays if the heatmap is colored at both ends of the scale, and that masked fields may simply display as white. The problem is, I would like to use the full spectrum from white to black to illustrate the range of the non-NA data. Is there anyway to distinguish NA cells with some other visual mechanism, such as a strikethrough?

Below is a minimum example of grayscale with a masked array (adapted from here). The NA values are probably masked here, you just can't tell because it is using white which is already being used as the color on the high end of the valid spectrum.

import numpy as np
from pylab import *

z = rand(10, 25)
z = np.ma.masked_array(z,mask=z>0.8)

c = pcolor(z)
set_cmap('gray')
colorbar()
c = pcolor(z, edgecolors='w', linewidths=1)
axis([0,25,0,10])
savefig('plt.png')
show()

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A simple solution is to just hatch the background axes patch. E.g.:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.cm as cm

data = np.random.random((10,25))
data = np.ma.masked_greater(data, 0.8)

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
im = ax.pcolor(data, cmap=cm.gray, edgecolors='white', linewidths=1)
fig.colorbar(im)

ax.patch.set_hatch('x')

plt.show()

enter image description here

On a side note, it would be better to use pcolormesh than pcolor, but there's a long-standing bug with setting edgecolors on pcolormesh. pcolormesh is much faster, and it draws lines in between the "empty" cells, though, which gives a nicer visual effect, in this particular case. It's a shame it doesn't currently work correctly.

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I was not able to reproduce Joe's answer by adding a patch by ax.patch.set_hatch('x'). Instead I had to create the patch as a rectangle according to this question as

import matplotlib.cm as cm
import matplotlib.patches as patches

data = np.random.random((10,25))
data = np.ma.masked_greater(data, 0.8)

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
im = ax.pcolormesh(data, cmap=cm.gray, edgecolors='white', linewidths=0)
fig.colorbar(im)

# ax.patch.set_hatch('x')  replaced by:
p = patches.Rectangle((0,0), 25, 10, hatch='xx', fill=None,zorder=-10)
ax.add_patch(p)

plt.show()

Furthermore, pcolormesh seems to be sorted out by now, so one can use it here.

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