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My question is related to the following code:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    // Find Prime Numbers from 0 to 100
    int i;
    for (i=2; i <= 100; i++) {
        int j = 2;
        boolean iPrime = true;

        //The following line gives incorrect results, but should execute faster
        //  while ((iPrime = true) && (j < (i / 2 + 1))) {
        //The following line gives correct results but performs un-necessary operations
        //by continuing to calculate after the number is found to be "not prime"
        while (j < (i / 2 + 1)) {

            j++;
            if ((i % j) == 0) {
                iPrime = false;
                //System.out.println(j + " is a factor of " + i);
            }
        }
        if (iPrime) {
            System.out.println(i + " is a prime number!");
        }
    }
}

Now, as I've commented in the code, what I'm trying to achieve is a faster execution of my program by executing the 'while' loop only when iPrime = true. 50% of numbers are divisible by 2 and so this once this has been established the calculations can stop.

I'm doing this project as part of a beginners 'example' from a book, I actually am trying to calculate up to 1000000 as quickly as possible just for my own "extra credit"...

I read that the "short circuit 'and' operator" && only evaluates the second half of the statement if the first half is true, if it is false, the two are not evaluated against each other (saving CPU)

And it will also exit the loop, which will save even more CPU...

But for some reason, it is not working correctly! I've put more System.out.println() statements throughout, listing what 'iPrime' is - and the output is stranget... It switches iPrime on and off and evaluates every number, which I cannot understand.

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Thanks for everyone's help! It was sooo obvious once I got your answers, and the sieve of Eratosthenes would be a much better algorithm indeed! I can only choose one answer but you've all been just as helpful, thanks! –  JBainesy Apr 21 '13 at 7:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

if((iPrime = true) && ...) should be if((iPrime) && ...).

By doing isPrime = true then you are assigning true to isPrime and not comparing its' value to true.

You might also want to see this to better understand what happens in your code:

At run time, the result of the assignment expression is the value of the variable after the assignment has occurred. The result of an assignment expression is not itself a variable.

So, when you use the = operator instead of == (Which is removed when you compare something to true - instead of writing if(someBoolean == true) you just write if(someBoolean)), you're actually satisfying the condition, always!

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1  
YES! That's SO clear now! I remember thinking when I first read about the = / == operators that they were going to trick me! Appreciate the help, I'll be careful of that trap from now on! –  JBainesy Apr 21 '13 at 7:41
    
I'm glad it helped, good luck :) –  Maroun Maroun Apr 21 '13 at 7:47

Simply change = into ==, that is, change

while ((iPrime = true) && (j < (i / 2 + 1)))

into

while ((iPrime == true) && (j < (i / 2 + 1)))

A full code with better performance

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // Find Prime Numbers from 0 to 100
    System.out.println(2 + " is a prime number!");
    for (int i = 3; i <= 100; i += 2) {
        boolean isPrime = true;
        for (int j = 3; j * j <= i; j += 2) {
            if ((i % j) == 0) {
                isPrime = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (isPrime) {
            System.out.println(i + " is a prime number!");
        }
    }
}

The fastest method I can think of is Sieve of Eratosthenes.

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Or while (iPrime && (j < (i / 2 + 1))) –  Zim-Zam O'Pootertoot Apr 20 '13 at 13:55
1  
someBoolean == true? Really? –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 20 '13 at 13:58
    
@AchintyaJha so posting 1 == 1 is good, right? –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 20 '13 at 14:00

Firstly on running your code I found that it shows 4 as a prime number which is incorrect. The reason is location of your j++ line. You should change your while loop as:

while (j < (i / 2 + 1)) {   
                if ((i % j) == 0) {
                    iPrime = false;

                    //System.out.println(j + " is a factor of " + i);
                    break;
                }
                j++;
            }

Moving on to the second part, you want to avoid extra calculation when you have established that the number is not prime. You can use break statement for this as in the code above.

The commented part does not work because you have an assignment instead of equality comparison.

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johnchen902 / Maroun Maroun have your bug fix; in addition, an optimization you can perform is

System.out.println("2 is a prime number!"); // the for loop won't detect 2 anymore
for (i=3; i <= 100; i+=2) {

Also, instead of performing the modulo operator on a number with all of the preceding odd numbers to see if it is prime, you can perform the modulo operator on a number with all of the preceding primes to see if it is prime - for example, store the primes that you find in an ArrayList and iterate through the list in your prime test.

And for a very CPU-efficient (but less space efficient) algorithm, use the Sieve of Eratosthenes

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