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i'm currently coding C# app for Windows Store.

I have Cache class, News UserControl class and MainPage class

I'm calling in MainPage constructor Cache class and then call InitializeData for News class where i using data from Cache, but there is problem, in Cache constructor i receiving datas but he didnt do whole function, he switching from Cache constructor to InitializeData at third await function.

MainPage:

public MainPage()
{
    this.InitializeComponent();

    Cache.Cache cache = new Cache.Cache();
    NewsContent.InitializeData(cache.MyData);
}

Cache:

    public Cache()
    {
        Initialization = Init();
    }

    public Task Initialization
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    private async Task Init()
    {
        try
        {
            cS        = await folder.CreateFileAsync("cache.txt", CreationCollisionOption.OpenIfExists);
            cS_titles = await folder.CreateFileAsync("titles_cache.txt", CreationCollisionOption.OpenIfExists);

            string contentOfFile = await FileIO.ReadTextAsync(cS);
            int contentLength = contentOfFile.Length;

            if (contentLength == 0) // download data for first using
            {
                await debug.Write("Is empty!");

                //.......
                // ....

                await FileIO.AppendTextAsync(cS, file_content);
                await FileIO.AppendTextAsync(cS_titles, file_content_titles);
            }
            else // check for same data, if isnt same download new, else nothing
            {
                await debug.Write(String.Format("Isnt empty. Is long: {0}", contentLength)); // here he break and continue to NewsContent.InitializeData(cache.MyData);

                // ....
                // ....
            }

            await MyFunction(); // i need get constructor to this point then he will do NewsContent.InitializeData(cache.MyData);
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {

        }
    }

Is this possible to do it? For any idea thank you!

share|improve this question
    
It seems whoever designed the Cache class understood how is async initialization supposed to work. Do you? If not, read Stephen Cleary's article about async and constructors. –  svick Apr 20 '13 at 15:55
    
I wrote Cache class –  user1085907 Apr 20 '13 at 16:07
    
Then why do you have the Initialization property that isn't actually used? –  svick Apr 20 '13 at 16:14
    
But its used in Constructor with function Init, i programming for metro about 3 days, it's complete diffrent from basic C#. –  user1085907 Apr 20 '13 at 16:21
    
Yeah, you set the property, but then never use its value. That means you might as well remove it completely. –  svick Apr 20 '13 at 16:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Stephen Cleary's article on async and constructors describes how to make this work.

In your case, I think the factory pattern (as suggested in Jon's answer) won't work for MainPage, because it's a GUI component. But the second approach, The Asynchronous Initialization Pattern, will work.

You already implemented that pattern for Cache, now you also need to implement it for MainPage:

public MainPage()
{
    Initialization = InitializeAsync();
}

public Task Initialization { get; private set; }

private async Task InitializeAsync()
{
    Cache.Cache cache = new Cache.Cache();
    await cache.Initialization;
    NewsContent.InitializeData(cache.MyData);        
}

If MainPage has some events that depend on the initialization being complete, you can make then async and add await this.Initialization at their beginning. Also, you might want to enable buttons or things like that at the end of MainPage's InitializeAsync().

share|improve this answer

This is what happens when you call an async method and never wait for it to finish, basically.

The whole point of an async method is that you don't block... and your constructor can't be asynchronous itself.

One option would be to write an asynchronous static method to create a cache:

static async Task<Cache> CreateCache()
{
    // Change your InitializeData to return the data which the cache needs
    var data = await InitializeData();
    return new Cache(data);
}

Fundamentally you still need whatever calls CreateCache to understand that it's happening asynchronously though. You don't want to block the UI thread waiting for it all to initialize.

EDIT: I hadn't spotted that this is called from the MainPage constructor. You could potentially apply the same approach again:

public static async Task<MainPage> CreateMainPage()
{
    var cache = await Cache.CreateCache();
    return new MainPage(cache);
}

This is assuming you really, really can't let the main page be created without the cache being completely initialized. If you could handle that (e.g. showing something like a "Loading..." status until it's finished initializing) then that would be better.

share|improve this answer
    
How would you call that when creating MainPage? –  svick Apr 20 '13 at 15:56
    
@svick: Hadn't spotted that. Have edited. –  Jon Skeet Apr 20 '13 at 16:12
    
So i should call CreateMainPage in constructor of MainPage? And move all from Cache constructor to function CreateCache? –  user1085907 Apr 20 '13 at 16:18
    
@user1085907: No, CreateMainPage calls the MainPage constructor. You can't write asynchronous constructors, and you need to start thinking more asynchronously. –  Jon Skeet Apr 20 '13 at 16:58

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