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I know that I can use struct array as function parameter like this

create a struct

struct number{
    int times;
    char numptr;
}numList[MAXNUM];

and create a function

void transform(int i, struct number *L){......}

pass the struct array to the function

transform(i, numList);

But why I can compile it successfully by VC ,and somehow fail to compile it by gcc? I use codeblocks and its compiler is gcc, part of its errors are here

warning: 'struct number' declared inside parameter list [enabled by default]|
warning: its scope is only this definition or declaration, which is probably not what you want[enabled by default]|
warning: passing argument 2 of 'transform' from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]|
note: expected 'struct number *' but argument is of type 'struct number *'|
error: conflicting types for 'transform'|
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this is in fact a curious diagnostic of your compiler. my gcc (v4.6) eats this code without problem. –  Jens Gustedt Apr 20 '13 at 17:16
    
i think you're supposed to be defined in the double to wrote transform(i, numList); outside of function probably. –  BLUEPIXY Apr 20 '13 at 17:17
1  
Try to provide a SSCCE code with the version of your compiler. However this note looks strange: expected 'struct number *' but argument is of type 'struct number *'.... –  md5 Apr 20 '13 at 17:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Note that the problem may simply be a matter of ordering. Here are two examples of an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example), one showing your problem and one not showing your problem. The difference between the two is where the function declarations appear in the source — before or after the definition of struct number.

Clean Compiling

#include <stdio.h>

enum { MAXNUM = 3 };

struct number{
    int times;
    char numptr;
}numList[MAXNUM];

void transform(int i, struct number *L);

extern void function(void);

void function(void)
{
    int i = 3;
    transform(3, numList);
    for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
        printf("%c: %d\n", numList[j].numptr, numList[j].times);
}

$ gcc -O3 -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes -Wold-style-definition -c vc1.c
$

Warnings Included

#include <stdio.h>

void transform(int i, struct number *L);

extern void function(void);

enum { MAXNUM = 3 };

struct number{
    int times;
    char numptr;
}numList[MAXNUM];

void function(void)
{
    int i = 3;
    transform(3, numList);
    for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
        printf("%c: %d\n", numList[j].numptr, numList[j].times);
}

Compilation:

$ gcc -O3   -g      -std=c99   -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes -Wold-style-definition     -c vc2.c
vc2.c:3:30: warning: ‘struct number’ declared inside parameter list [enabled by default]
vc2.c:3:30: warning: its scope is only this definition or declaration, which is probably not what you want [enabled by default]
vc2.c: In function ‘function’:
vc2.c:17:5: warning: passing argument 2 of ‘transform’ from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default]
vc2.c:3:6: note: expected ‘struct number *’ but argument is of type ‘struct number *’
$

You could fix the second example by adding a line struct number; just after the #include (or, indeed, before it). Or by moving the definition of struct number above the declaration of void transform(int i, struct number *L);. It is easier to run into this problem if you have two source files, one defining the transform() function and separate one using it. That's when you start using headers — they can be used to provide consistency checking between separate files.

Compiler: GCC 4.7.1 on Mac OS X 10.7.5.

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Thank you very much! I was perplexed by this prolem for a long time, but now I know where the mistake is. –  Zwinters Apr 20 '13 at 18:08

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