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In .Net4, Monitor.Enter(Object) is marked as obsolete :

[ObsoleteAttribute("This method does not allow its caller to reliably release the lock.  Please use an overload with a lockTaken argument instead.")]
public static void Enter(
    Object obj
)

And there is a new method Monitor.Enter(lockObject, acquiredLock) with this usage :

bool acquiredLock = false;

try
{
    Monitor.Enter(lockObject, ref acquiredLock);

    // Code that accesses resources that are protected by the lock.

}
finally
{
    if (acquiredLock)
    {
        Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
    }
}

I used to do it this way :

Monitor.Enter(lockObject);
try
{

    // Code that accesses resources that are protected by the lock.
}
finally
{
    Monitor.Exit(lockObject);
}

Is it wrong ? Why ? Maybe with an interupt after the enter but before the try ?
As Eamon Nerbonne asked : what happens if there's an async exception in the finally right before monitor.exit?

Answer : ThreadAbortException

When this exception is raised, the runtime executes all the finally blocks before ending the thread.

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2  
What happens if there's an async exception in the finally right before monitor.exit? –  Eamon Nerbonne Jan 28 '10 at 11:27
    
I don't know about other asynchronous exceptions, but the CLR prevents abort exceptions from interrupting finally blocks - and other asynchronous exceptions are more likely to take down the process anyway. –  Jon Skeet Mar 5 '10 at 11:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As you suggest right at the end of the question, the problem is that an asynchronous exception could be thrown after the call to Monitor.Enter but before you enter the try block.

The new way of doing things makes sure that whatever happens, you'll hit the finally block and be able to release the lock if you acquired it. (You may not acquire it if Monitor.Enter throws an exception, for example.)

IIRC, this is the new behaviour of the lock keyword when targeting .NET 4.0.

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1  
Yup, lock has been changed to use the new construct (or at least it was in beta1) –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 23 '09 at 9:56
1  
I will accept the answer if you can answer to Eamon Nerbonne question ;) –  Guillaume Mar 5 '10 at 11:06

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