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This is python syntax related question... Is there more elegant and more pythonic way of doing this:

>>> test = [[1,2], [3,4,5], [1,2,3,4,5,6]]
>>> result = []
>>> for i in test: result += i
>>> result
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Join multiple list (stored inside another list) to one long list?

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marked as duplicate by Ashwini Chaudhary, minitech, Vyktor, Aya, Lattyware Apr 20 '13 at 18:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@AshwiniChaudhary you're right it's a duplicate, didn't occur to me to use word flat when searching for similar questions. –  Vyktor Apr 20 '13 at 18:03
3  
There is no inherent harm to posting a duplicate, don't worry. Sometimes it's laziness on the poster's part, but in some cases it's a case of different wording, that's why duplicated don't disappear, and instead remain open as 'pointers' to the duplicated question, which means those search terms now point to an answer. –  Lattyware Apr 20 '13 at 18:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Use the itertools.chain.from_iterable() classmethod:

from itertools import chain

result = list(chain.from_iterable(test))

If all you need to do is iterate over the chained lists, then don't materialize it to a list(), just loop:

for elem in chain.from_iterable(test):
    print(elem, end=' ')   # prints 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6

You can also use parameter unpacking, directly on itertools.chain:

for elem in chain(*test):

But do this only with a smaller list.

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Do you? I think from_iterable is not necessary or useful in this case. –  Andrew Gorcester Apr 20 '13 at 18:04
    
@A.R.S.: In this case *test will do. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 20 '13 at 18:04
3  
from_iterable() makes far more sense here. Why use * unpacking when from_iterable() is designed to do the job? On a small list, there is no difference, but on a larger one, it could make a big difference. –  Lattyware Apr 20 '13 at 18:07
2  
@Lattyware: Hrm, yes, with a big list it'll use a copy, you have a point ther. –  Martijn Pieters Apr 20 '13 at 18:19
1  
Yeah. It's not the end of the world, but it makes a lot more sense to just always use chain.from_iterable() over * unpacking - there is no real downside (slightly less nice syntax, but not horrific), and a potential gain. It also means the code is more flexible if it happens to take a generator or a large list tomorrow, which is always a possibility with a dynamic language like Python. –  Lattyware Apr 20 '13 at 18:22

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