Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I heard that "Lesser the number of indexes means faster inserts, updates and deletes". Is this correct? If yes, then why?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Tim Schmelter, MarcinJuraszek, Corbin, rs., marc_s Apr 20 '13 at 20:39

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Did you read the SO rules? –  Dan Bracuk Apr 20 '13 at 20:14
    
@DanBracuk: lol! –  Westie Apr 20 '13 at 20:14
    
I don't know if you're using Oracle, but this thread is a pretty good read. –  Westie Apr 20 '13 at 20:18
    
at least he got his answer before the question got closed. –  Dan Bracuk Apr 20 '13 at 20:40
    
@DanBracuk - Is there any way i could have improved this question or is it just "bad"? Perhaps this would make it worth re-opening - So an index is just a way to sort data in a column and keep that sort order handy for quickly accessing the column elements ? If we update a non-indexed column, then performance should not be affected, right ? –  david blaine Apr 20 '13 at 20:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes it's correct.

Indexes make select queries run faster. However, whenever you write you your tables, the indexes have to be updated as well, and that takes time.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just to add: obviously the more indexes you have, the slower the process becomes. –  Westie Apr 20 '13 at 20:14
1  
only makes select queries run faster of the where clause has columns that have indexes ... –  tgkprog Apr 20 '13 at 20:16
    
google.co.in/…? replace sql with your database name like my-sql –  tgkprog Apr 20 '13 at 20:18
    
So an index is just a way to sort data in a column and keep that sort order handy for quickly accessing the column elements ? If we update a non-indexed column, then performance should not be affected, right ? –  david blaine Apr 20 '13 at 20:20
1  
@davidblaine: for MVCC databases (Postgres, MySQL/Innodb and some others), index would have to be updated even if you update non-indexed column –  mvp Apr 20 '13 at 20:24

YES

It is important to know how the indexes work.

The indexes (you create) are secondary and most often using B+ trees or something similar. The values in these trees point to records you have in your database so the SELECT clauses using the indexed columns are faster as they can be found quickly in the tree (faster than just checking each line) but the update, insert and delete in the database needs also the indexes to be updated which slows the process.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.