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I am having difficulty figuring out what the syntax would be for the last key in a Python dictionary. I know that for a Python list, one may say this to denote the last:

list[-1]

I also know that one can get a list of the keys of a dictionary as follows:

dict.keys()

However, when I attempt to use the logical following code, it doesnt work:

dict.keys(-1)

It says that keys cant take any arguments and 1 is given. If keys cant take args, then how can I denote that I want the last key in the list?

XXXXX I am operating under the assumption that Python dictionaries are ordered in the order in which items are added to the dictionary with most recent item last. For this reason, I would like to access the last key in the dictionary.XXXXX

I am now told that the dictionary keys are not in order based on when they were added. How then would I be able to choose the most recently added key?

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1  
There's no such thing as the "last" key in a dictionary any more than there is a "first" key. –  kindall Apr 20 '13 at 21:16
    
Why do you want the last key? Python dictionaries aren't ordered. –  robert king Apr 20 '13 at 21:16
    
list(-1) is not how you get the last element in a list... That will give you an error (you are attempting to call a list). I think you meant list[-1]. –  Rushy Panchal Apr 20 '13 at 21:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If insertion order matters, take a look at collections.OrderedDict:

An OrderedDict is a dict that remembers the order that keys were first inserted. If a new entry overwrites an existing entry, the original insertion position is left unchanged. Deleting an entry and reinserting it will move it to the end.


In [1]: from collections import OrderedDict

In [2]: od = OrderedDict(zip('bar','foo'))

In [3]: od
Out[3]: OrderedDict([('b', 'f'), ('a', 'o'), ('r', 'o')])

In [4]: od.keys()[-1]
Out[4]: 'r'

In [5]: od.popitem() # also removes the last item
Out[5]: ('r', 'o')
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It seems like you want to do that:

dict.keys()[-1]

dict.keys() returns a list of your dictionary's keys. Once you got the list, the -1 index allows you getting the last element of a list.

Since a dictionary is unordered, it's doesn't make sense to get the last key of your dictionary.

Perhaps you want to sort them before. It would look like that:

sorted(dict.keys())[-1]
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Just a comment on dict.keys()[-1] This works in Python 2.7*, but not in Python 3. Python 3 will error: TypeError: 'dict_keys' object does not support indexing –  continuousqa Aug 9 at 20:18
sorted(dict.keys())[-1]

Otherwise the keys is just unordered list and last one has no meaning and can be different on various python versions.

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It doesn't make sense to ask for the "last" key in a dictionary, because dictionary keys are unordered. You can get the list of keys and get the last one if you like, but that's not in any sense the "last key in a dictionary".

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Well the dictionary is automatically going to be in the order in which it is edited so in order to access the most recent key, I need to access the last one or most recently added. –  cbbcbail Apr 20 '13 at 21:18
5  
@cbbcbail - no, no, no... –  root Apr 20 '13 at 21:19
8  
No, absolutely not! The dictionary is not going to be the order in which you edited it. It is an arbitrary order, depending on the hash value of the key. –  Daniel Roseman Apr 20 '13 at 21:19
    
Updated question to compensate for previous lack of knowledge. –  cbbcbail Apr 20 '13 at 21:25
1  
@cbbcbail You edit asks "How then would I be able to choose the most recently added key?" The answer remains that you can't - that information simply isn't stored in a dict. You need to use another data structure (an OrderedDict, for example), or simply manually keep a variable around with the last added value. –  Lattyware Apr 20 '13 at 21:26

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