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I am new to C and I don't fully understand all this pointer and memory allocation stuff, so sorry if I am conceptually wrong. I am trying to access string elements in an array of strings, but the array of strings is located in a struct, and every time I try to access it my program crashes.

I am getting an error when I try to do this if statement check

if (strcmp(functionList[holder].otherServers[i], "") == 0)

I just want to check if the current structure element in the array of structs (functionList[holder]) has a empty value filled for its elements in its array of strings (otherServers[i]). And when it finds its first empty element, all I want to do is copy a string in that index of the array of strings (otherServers[i])

And here is my code (note: I took out a lot of the code I thought was irrelevant for the question)

struct function {
    char name[20];
    int parameterNumer;
    int canDo;
    //currently the system has a 10 server max. You can change this easily
    char *otherServers[10];    
};

//global scope variables
//currently the system has a 10 server max. You can change this easily
char *serverList[10];
struct function functionList[10] = {{"",0, 0, {}}};
int numberofOtherServers;

while(strcmp(functionList[i].name, "") != 0 && i != -1)
{            
    //if the function exist in the functionList already, then just add server to the functions list of capable servers
    if(strcmp(functionList[i].name, functionName) == 0 && functionList[i].parameterNumer == functionParam)
    {
        holder = i;
        //function found so go through the functions list of servers and add it to the list
        i = 0;
        while(i >= 0)
        {
            if(strcmp(functionList[holder].otherServers[i], "") == 0)
            {
                strcpy(functionList[holder].otherServers[i], serverHelloName);
                i = -1; //
            }
            if(i == 9)
            { //ran through entire list of all possible servers and couldnt find an empty slot
                printf("server list full, should allow more room for other servers");
                fflush(stdout);
                i = -1;
            }
        }
        printf("yay");
        fflush(stdout);
    }
    if(i == 9)
    { //ran through entire list of all possible functions and did not see an empty slot or there is no match
        printf("function list full so could not add, and there was no match for any functions");
        fflush(stdout);
        i = -1;
    }
    i++;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code does not show allocation of otherServers. When you have an array of character pointers, like otherServers, you need to allocate memory for each of the strings so there is something to point to.

This means you need to check the pointer points somewhere valid before you can do this strcmp() and strcpy():

if(strcmp(functionList[holder].otherServers[i], "") == 0) {
    strcpy(functionList[holder].otherServers[i], serverHelloName);
    i = -1;
}

Instead this snippet will check that otherServers[i] hasn't already been allocated and then allocate enough memory to store the string:

if ( functionList[holder].otherServers[i] == NULL ) {
    // add one for the terminator
    functionList[holder].otherServers[i] = malloc(strlen(serverHelloName) + 1);

    // make sure the allocation worked
    if ( functionList[holder].otherServers[i] == NULL ) {
        // something went wrong so bail
        break;
    }
    strcpy(functionList[holder].otherServers[i], serverHelloName);
}

When you have finished with otherServers[] or functionList[] itself, you need to free the memory allocated earlier:

for ( i = 0; i < 10; i++ ) {

    if ( functionList[holder].otherServers[i] != NULL ) {
        free(functionList[holder].otherServers[i]);
        functionList[holder].otherServers[i] = NULL;
    }
}
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you my friend, are a life saver!!!!!!! –  user2158382 Apr 20 '13 at 23:03

It's better to put a NUL in place of a plain "" in an initializer:

struct function functionList[10] = {{{'\0'},0, 0, {}}};

To check whether the name in your example is then assigned or not, you just dereference it and check for the NUL character:

*functionList[i].name == '\0'

strcmp checks for a nul character (aka zero-terminator), beginning at the offset supplied, and will keep going beyond the array if it doesn't find one - resulting in undefined behaviour, most likely an access violation, depending on how this buffer was allocated.

SpacedMonkey beat me to the remainder of the valid answer; you need to allocate storage for a string. By default a pointer just points to some area in memory - you must allocate it by hand with malloc before using it, and release it using free.

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