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If I write the following Dart code, how do I know which click handler happens first?

main() {
  var button = new ButtonElement();
  var stream = button.onClick.asBroadcastStream();

  stream.listen(clickHandler1);
  stream.listen(clickHandler2);
}

Let's say I'm in other code that doesn't know anything about the first two click handlers, but I register another one.

  • Can I know that the stream has two listeners?
  • Can I pause or cancel all other subscribers?
  • If I write button.onClick.asBroadcastStream() again elsewhere, does it point to the same stream as was used in main?
  • Can I say in one of the handlers to not pass event on to the other broadcast listener? Is that a consumer?
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2 Answers

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Let's say I'm in other code that doesn't know anything about the first two click handlers, but I register another one.

Can I know that the stream has two listeners?

No, you can't. You could extend the stream class or wrap it and provide this functionality yourself, but it does not feel like a good design choice, because I don't think a listener should know about other listeners. What are you trying to do exactly? Perhaps there's a better way than letting listeners know about each other.

Can I pause or cancel all other subscribers?

You can cancel/pause/resume only the subscriber you are dealing with. Again, you probably shouldn't touch other listeners, but I guess you could wrap/extend the Stream class to have this behavior.

If I write button.onClick.asBroadcastStream() again elsewhere, does it point to the same stream as was used in main?

No, at least not at the current version of SDK. So, unfortunately, you need to store a reference to this broadcast stream somewhere, and refer to it, because calling asBroadcastStream() multiple times will not yield in the result you might expect. (Note: at least based on quick testing: http://d.pr/i/Ip0K although the documentation seems to indicate different, I have yet to test a bit more when I find the time).

Can I say in one of the handlers to not pass event on to the other broadcast listener?

Well, there's stopPropagation() in the HTML land which means that the event won't propagate to other elements, but it's probably not what you were looking for.

For being able to stop an event firing in other listeners, there needs to be an order of which the listeners are getting called. I believe the order is the order of registration of those listeners. From the design perspective, I don't think it would be a good idea to allow a listener to cancel/pause others.

Event propagation in HTML makes sense since it's about hierarchy, but here we don't have that (and even in case of events in HTML there can be multiple listeners for the single element).

There's no way to assign weight to listeners or define the order of importance, therefore it's not surprising that there isn't a way to stop the event.

Instead of letting listeners know about each other and manipulate each other, maybe you should try to think of another way to approach your problem (whatever that is).

Is that a consumer?

The StreamConsumer is just a class that you can implement if you want to allow other streams to be piped into your class.

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You are wrong about asBroadcastStream() –  Tobias Ritzau May 3 '13 at 7:00
    
Hmm I could be wrong, this code: d.pr/i/Ip0K however prints first false then true. So they refer to different objects. I may investigate this in more detail when I find the time.. there can also be changes in the codebase, and remember that what you linked in your answer is different from e.g. SDK's Stream implementation :) –  Kai Sellgren May 3 '13 at 12:53
    
Your code creates two broadcast streams. If you instead call asBroadcastStream() on the first broadcast stream you created you will get the same. That is what is asked. The stream implementation returns this if it is a broadcast stream. I referred to the stream used in the question. –  Tobias Ritzau May 4 '13 at 21:12
    
Hmm. I read the question again, I still think he refers to what I showed in the code sample in the screenshot, but I'm not going to argue about that so I let the asker to decide what he wants. –  Kai Sellgren May 5 '13 at 11:15
    
I took another look at it and the thing is that button.onClick returns a new Stream every time it is called so you are right. I assumed that you got the same stream every time. If you take the returned stream and call asBroadcastSteam() on that you will get the same instance back. There is no reason to call asBroadcastStream() on it though since it is already a broadcast stream. :) –  Tobias Ritzau May 6 '13 at 12:11
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Can I know that the stream has two listeners?

No, you have a ´Stream´ that wraps the DOM event handling. There is no such functionality.

Can I pause or cancel all other subscribers?

Look at Event.stopPropagation() and Event.stopImmediatePropagation(), and possibly Event.preventDefault().

If I write button.onClick.asBroadcastStream() again elsewhere, does it point to the same stream as was used in main?

[Updated] No, the current implementation doesn't gives you the same Stream back since the onClick getter returns a new stream every time it is invoked. However, the returned stream is already a broadcast stream so you shouldn't invoke asBroadcastStream() on it. If you do you will hower just get a reference to the same object back.

Stream<T> asBroadcastStream() => this;

Can I say in one of the handlers to not pass event on to the other broadcast listener? Is that a consumer?

Again, take a look at Event.stopPropagation() and Event.stopImmediatePropagation(), and possibly Event.preventDefault().

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Event.stopPropagation() won't prevent other listeners getting called (d.pr/i/4ZFx -- prints twice). It merely stops propagation, which also happens to be purely a DOM thing due to the hierarchy. Remember that streams are used for many purposes, not just for the DOM. :) –  Kai Sellgren May 3 '13 at 12:58
    
You are right, that is what the immediate version is for, but you only stop the callbacks that follows and there is no guarantee of order... Sure streams are used for many things but the question is about the DOM. –  Tobias Ritzau May 4 '13 at 21:15
    
I should also add that you don't have to call asBroadcastStream() on a DOM handler since it is already a broadcast stream. –  Tobias Ritzau May 4 '13 at 21:17
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