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I've setup a simple animator method like so:

Animator: function (obj, aniArgs, duration, aniEasArgs, completeFunction) {
    obj.stop(true, true).animate(aniArgs, {
        duration: duration,
        queue: false,
        specialEasing: aniEasArgs,
        complete: function () {
            if (completeFunction !== null) {

            };
        }
    });
    return obj;
},

What I'd like to do is be able to pass in string of jQuery to run in the complete callback. Everything else works fine. How, for example, would I pass in

$('#someElement').hide(500);

into the callback?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Just call completeFunction()? –  Brendan Scarvell Apr 21 '13 at 1:17
    
I'll be using this function to call different animations on different elements. So Plugin.Animator(element,{'opacity':0.5}, 500, {'opacity':'linear'}, " .... ") The ... is where the callback info (such as $('#someElement').hide(500) would need to go. I'm not sure I follow you by calling completeFunction()? –  Aaron Apr 21 '13 at 1:19
    
how is Animator called –  Arun P Johny Apr 21 '13 at 1:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First, create a function with the code you want to run:

function complete() {
    $('#someElement').hide(500);
}

Then, pass that function in when you call Animator:

Animator( obj, aniArgs, duration, aniEasArgs, complete );

Or, you can put the function inline:

Animator( obj, aniArgs, duration, aniEasArgs, function() {
    $('#someElement').hide(500);
});

Those both work the same way, you can use either style depending on what makes your code easier to read.

Either way, change your Animator code to:

        if( completeFunction ) {
            completeFunction();
        };

Or, you'll often see that written this way:

        completeFunction && completeFunction();

They both do exactly the same thing. It's just a matter of taste which you use, just thought I'd mention both variations so you'll recognize them when you see them.

Note that the !== null test is not required here, and in fact isn't what you want. That's because if the caller does not pass in a completeFunction, the value of that variable will be undefined, not null, so your test won't work. Interestingly enough, you can use != null in this case, because that will test for both null and undefined and treat them the same. But really you just don't need this explicit test at all, if the only thing you're checking for is whether the caller provided a completeFunction callback or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Thanks so much, and it maintains readability quite well too :) –  Aaron Apr 21 '13 at 1:27
    
Great! Glad to help. Also I just added a couple more relevant notes to the answer. –  Michael Geary Apr 21 '13 at 1:32
    
Nice, thanks again! –  Aaron Apr 21 '13 at 1:37
    
You were right. It's been a long day :-) –  orb Apr 21 '13 at 1:44
1  
@orb - No worries, it happens to the best of us. Just last night I posted a simple jQuery call that was completely wrong! Luckily the OP on that question caught my error and was quite gracious about it too. :-) –  Michael Geary Apr 21 '13 at 2:33

Try

Animator: function (obj, aniArgs, duration, aniEasArgs, completeFunction) {
    obj.stop(true, true).animate(aniArgs, {
        duration: duration,
        queue: false,
        specialEasing: aniEasArgs,
        complete: function () {
            if (jQuery.isFunction(completeFunction )) {
                completeFunction.apply(this, arguments);
            };
        }
    });
    return obj;
},

Theb

x.Animator(obj, aniArgs, duration, aniEasArgs, function(){
    $('#someElement').hide(500);
})
share|improve this answer

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