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I have the following code snippet that attempts to use this and super.

class SuperClass
{
    public final int x=10;
    public final String s="super";

    public String notOverridden()
    {
        return "Inside super";
    }

    public String overrriden()
    {
        return "Inside super";
    }
}

final class SubClass extends SuperClass
{
    private final int y=15;
    private final String s="sub"; //Shadowed member.

    @Override
    public String overrriden()
    {
        return "Inside sub";
    }

    public void test()
    {        
        System.out.println(super.notOverridden());
        System.out.println(this.notOverridden());

        System.out.println(this.overrriden());
        System.out.println(super.overrriden());

        System.out.println(this.s);
        System.out.println(super.s);

        System.out.println(this.x);
        System.out.println(super.x);

        System.out.println(this.y);
    }
}

public final class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        SubClass subClass=new SubClass();
        subClass.test();
    }
}

In this simplest of Java code, the statements that redirect the output to the console inside the method test() within the class SubClass display the following output.

Inside super
Inside super
Inside sub
Inside super
sub
super
10
10
15

So, it appears that there is no difference between this and super, when they are used to access methods which are not overridden in its subclass(es) and in case of variables, when they are not shadowed in its subclass(es).

Both of them tend to point to super class members. There is however, an obvious difference, if such is not a case.

Are they same, when methods are not overridden or variables are not shadowed in respective subclasses?

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1  
It sounds like you've already answered your question, but Yes. –  supersam654 Apr 21 '13 at 1:17
1  
Yes, but I think this is dangerous to assume. You might eventually override methods in the subclass and then super and this will not give the same result. –  Matt Apr 21 '13 at 1:20
    
"methods which are not overridden in its subclass(es)" A class should not know anything about its subclasses. You cannot be sure that some subclass down the line does not override the method unless it is final. –  newacct Apr 21 '13 at 20:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So, it appears that there is no difference between this and super, when they are used to access methods which are not overridden in its subclass(es) and in case of variables, when they are not shadowed in its subclass(es).

There is a difference. If you override methods in third class, and call test from it, you will see, that super still calls implementations of SuperClass. And this will call new implementations (overridden).

Addition:

this.method() usage implies the method belongs to instance of the object. So the last implementation will be used (with exception of private methods).

super.method() usage implies method of the instance, but implemented before the current class (super, or super.super etc).

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Also, you can't invoke this() and super() in same constructor. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 21 '13 at 1:27
    
super is relative, so it'll call the overridden methods in SubClass. this will too, unless they've been overriden in SubSubClass. –  Pescis Apr 21 '13 at 1:28

Yes, they are the same. notOverridden methods and not shadowed variables are inherited by subclass.

To better understand this, knowing how object is located in memory is helpful. For example in the figure below. Assume it's an object of a subclass. The blue area is what it inherits from its parent, and the yellow area is what is defined by itself. The method has the similar design except that it uses a Vtable.

Child object has the same memory layout as parent objects, except that it needs more space to place the newly added fields. The benefit of this layout is that a pointer of parent type pointing at a subclass object still sees the parent object at the beginning.

enter image description here

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