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If I create multiple objects using Object.create() on an object literal, I get multiple unique objects that don't share property values. However, when I use Object.create() on an object returned from a module, it looks like they share the same reference? Why is that?

#1 Module:

var objModule = (function () {
  var name = "module 1";
  var setName = function( strName ) {
    name = strName;
  };
  var getName = function() {
    return name;
  };

  return {
    setName: setName,
    getName: getName
  };
}());

var objModule2 = Object.create(objModule);
objModule2.setName("module 2");

console.log(objModule.getName()); // WRONG prints "module 2"
console.log(objModule2.getName()); // prints "module 2"

#2 Literal:

var objLiteral = {
  name : "literal 1"
};
var objLiteral2 = Object.create(objLiteral);
objLiteral2.name = "literal 2";

console.log(objLiteral.name); // prints "literal 1"
console.log(objLiteral2.name); // prints "literal 2"

EDIT

#3 Module "Constructor":

var module = function () {
  var name = "module 1";
  var setName = function( strName ) {
    name = strName;
  };
  var getName = function() {
    return name;
  };

  return {
    setName: setName,
    getName: getName
  };
};

var objModule1 = module();
var objModule2 = module();
objModule2.setName("module 2");

console.log(objModule1.getName()); // prints "module 1"
console.log(objModule2.getName()); // prints "module 2"

EDIT

If I use the module like a constructor (as suggested by @Matt Browne) and create 2 objects, the result is like using an object literal. What I'd like to understand is why does module example #1 behave differently than module example #3?

EDIT 2

As @ben336 explained, the code:

var objModule2 = Object.create(objModule); 

will set the objModule2's prototype to objModule. That doesn't happen in example #3, so those two objects don't share the same closure property.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Example 1

The first argument of Object.create specifies the prototype object for the new object being created. Since in your first example you're setting your existing object to be the prototype of your new object, when you call the functions they're modifying the variable you've stored in a closure, which is then accessed by both your existing object and the new one.

The 2 key things to understand here are:

  1. This code

    var objModule = function () {
      var name = "module 1";
      var setName = function( strName ) {
        name = strName;
      };
      var getName = function() {
        return name;
      };
    
      return {
        setName: setName,
        getName: getName
      };
    }();
    

    creates a closure with the functions getName and setName holding access to the name variable.

  2. those functions are properties of objModule, and when you call Object.create you set objModule to be the prototype of objModule2, and it gains access to those functions as well.

Since the 2 objects share those functions, and they have access to the closure created by the module rather than storing the name property locally on either object, when you call the set function with one object, it will update the closure and thus update both objects.

Example 2

In the second example you're also setting the object to be the prototype of the new object, but you're declaring a property on the local object which overrides the property on the prototype.

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So when objModule2 calls setName("module 2"), it is calling the method on its prototype (objModule2 will use the prototype method unless it "overwrites"/shadows it by creating it's own setName() method) which is objModule's method and that method has access to the setName() method of the closure? If that is correct, then I understand. –  Rick Jolly Apr 21 '13 at 6:19
    
That method IS the setname function of the closure. Otherwise that is exactly correct –  Ben McCormick Apr 21 '13 at 12:11
    
I was wrong to call setName of the module a method with access to setName of the closure. It's more accurately a pointer to the closure method. I can break that pointer if I assign setName of the module to a something else later in the code. As an experiment, I assigned setName to a different function that tried to access the closure property but it couldn't because there was no pointer reference to that property. –  Rick Jolly Apr 21 '13 at 16:57
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objModule2.setName refers to the same function as objModule.setName, but with a different this. (Object.create doesn't copy anything)
Calling it will set the same local variable.

objLiteral2.name = "literal 2" creates a new property on objLiteral2, which shadows the inherited objLiteral.name.

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Very concise high-level answer - thanks. @ben336 helped me understand why this happens by explaining that objModule2 gets the prototype from objModule. –  Rick Jolly Apr 21 '13 at 6:30
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I think what you're going for here would be better accomplished by removing the parentheses () at the end of the objModule function, and renaming it to something that makes it clear it's a constructor, i.e. do this instead:

var makeObjModule = function() {
  var name = "module 1";
  var setName = function( strName ) {
    name = strName;
  };
  var getName = function() {
    return name;
  };

  return {
    setName: setName,
    getName: getName
  };
}; //removed parentheses here

(Personally I'd use the function objModule() syntax too while I was at it, but that's a separate point and a matter of personal preference.)

Then you can create your instances:

var objModule = makeObjModule();
var objModule2 = makeObjModule();

The Object.create approach is of course a valid way of going about this as well; for more details on making that work, see @ben336's answer.

Personally I find Object.create to be more useful when doing inheritance than when doing simple construction like this. (Some people also prefer it to using the new keyword when using prototypal inheritance, but since you're using the module pattern I think it's easier to just use a "maker"/constructor function as I showed above.)

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P.S. You may find my answer here useful as well. –  Matt Browne Apr 21 '13 at 2:40
    
Thanks! I've added your suggestion as example 3. objModule2 doesn't share the prototype of objModule in this case, so they don't share the same closure variables - correct? –  Rick Jolly Apr 21 '13 at 4:47
1  
That's correct - using the approach in my answer (and your example 3) there's no prototype sharing whatsoever. It could be modified to make use of a prototype which could save a little memory by not having the methods redefined for each instance, but the memory savings are pretty negligable and it looks a little awkward, which is why I recommend keeping prototypes out of it for a simple case like this when using the module pattern. –  Matt Browne Apr 21 '13 at 13:55
    
BTW I don't personally think the module pattern offers significant advantages over more traditional prototype-based OOP in most cases so be sure you've considered that approach (where instances are created with the "new" keyword). There are also approaches that use Object.create but don't use the module pattern that are worth considering. –  Matt Browne Apr 21 '13 at 13:56
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