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I've tried the following code:

OleDbConnection My_Connection = new OleDbConnection("Provider=Microsoft.Jet...
My_Connection.Open();
string sql = " UPDATE Rooms SET [Room Status] = 'Taken', [Available] = 'No' WHERE [RoomNumber] = " + textBox5.Text;
OleDbCommand My_Command = new OleDbCommand(sql, My_Connection);
My_Command.ExecuteNonQuery();
My_Connection.Close();

and the error is: Datatype mismatch in criteria expression

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That is indeed a weakness with the Jet Engine: when giving errors like that, it doesn't say where the error is exactly. Carefully check the type of each field. For instance, are you sure that Available is a text field? Oh, and you should really use parameters instead of allowing SQL injections like that. –  Mr Lister Apr 21 '13 at 6:18
    
What are the datatypes for your columns? It's probably a mismatch on RoomNumber - try casting to int. –  Tim Apr 21 '13 at 6:18
    
RoomNumber: 'Number', Room Status: 'Text', Available: 'Yes/No' –  Ahmad Hani Hamarsheh Apr 21 '13 at 6:47
    
I've Changed The 'Available' column's datatype to Text and it worked –  Ahmad Hani Hamarsheh Apr 21 '13 at 6:53
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1 Answer 1

As shown in the comments above, the Available field is a Yes/No, so you can't store strings like 'No' in it.

The solution, then, is to use the value -1 for Yes and 0 for no. Without quotes.

Note: the workaround as done in the comments, to change the column type of the database itself, is not recommended.

Another thing is to avoid the possibility for SQL injection by using a parameter for the variable instead of using the user input directly. So the eventual code becomes something like

OleDbConnection My_Connection = new OleDbConnection("Provider=Microsoft.Jet...
My_Connection.Open();
string sql = " UPDATE Rooms SET [Room Status] = 'Taken', [Available] = 0"+
             " WHERE [RoomNumber] = ?";
OleDbCommand My_Command = new OleDbCommand(sql, My_Connection);
My_Command.Parameters.AddWithValue("RoomNumber",  Convert.ToInt32(textBox5.Text));
My_Command.ExecuteNonQuery();
My_Connection.Close();

Much safer!

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-1 for yes? That's an odd convention, I'd think. I would have expected 1 for yes. –  Tim Apr 21 '13 at 11:12
1  
@Tim That's right, and for other DB engines, you'd be right. But this is MS-Access we're talking about here... I think it's based on the VBA convention, where the same thing happens. –  Mr Lister Apr 21 '13 at 11:24
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