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I constantly find myself writing similar code like the example below:

if (object["Object Name"] != null) {
    if (object["Object Name"] == "Some Value") {
        // Do Statement A
    } else {
        // Do Statement B
    }
} else {
    // Do Statement B
}

The problem here is that I much check if an object is null or not and then I can check it for it's actual contents.

"Statement B" is always the same and in my case is usually a SQL statement.

There must be a better way around this?

Thanks
Stephen

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5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

There is short circuiting in C# so you can do:

if(null != object && object.name == foo)
  do A
else
  do B

C# always evaluates the first expression in the conditional statement first and if that fails, it doesn't try anything else in that part of the statement.

To further this point, if you are going to have an expensive operation in the conditional statement along with one or more inexpensive operations, it's good to put it at the end if possible, so it will only check the expensive operation when it really needs to. So something like

if(trivial comparison && trivial comparison && REALLY EXPENSIVE OPERATION)

It will now only execute the expensive operation as a last resort.

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1  
If the object is null, the statement evaluates false, without even checking object.name. –  badbod99 Oct 23 '09 at 11:40
    
yeah I suppose that is true also. –  Kevin Oct 23 '09 at 11:45
    
Thank you! I didn't think this was possible but it was obviously the way I was writing the if statement. Thx :) –  GateKiller Oct 23 '09 at 11:50
1  
It doesn't work this way in VB.net though, you have to use AndAlso or something similar. Be careful when switching languages they subtle, fundamental differences :D –  Robert Oct 23 '09 at 13:32
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Since C# does short circuiting, yes. Try this:

if (object["Object Name"] != null && object["Object Name"] == "Some Value") 
{
    // Do Statement A
} 
else 
{
    // Do Statement B
}
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I think rewriting the if-then-else to this will make it look nicer because of the single B-statement.

if ((object["Object Name"] != null) && (object["Object Name"] == "Some Value")) 
{
    // Do Statement A
} 
else 
{
    // Do Statement B
}
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Why the double check? Surely this would be sufficient:

if(object["Object Name"] == "Some Value") {
    // Do statement A
} else {
    // Do statement B
}

I sort of see what you're getting at with null checking, but the particular example you give doesn't require it.

EDIT: Now if you had written this instead:

if (object != null) {
    if (object["Object Name"] == "Some Value") {
        // Do Statement A
    } else {
        // Do Statement B
    }
} else {
    // Do Statement B
}

then the solution would be:

if(object != null && object["Object Name"] == "Some Value") {
    // Do Statement A
} else {
    // Do Statement B
}
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if object doesn't contain the item "Object Name" a null exception will be thrown. –  GateKiller Oct 23 '09 at 11:51
2  
If that was the case, then testing for object["Object Name"] == null would also throw the exception. –  Christian Hayter Oct 23 '09 at 11:58
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DISCLAIMER: Not doing the general short circuit method.

Well, you could create a separate function to perform the lookup, especially if the query remains the same. So something like this: (pseudocode incoming)

private bool IsNullCheck(string objectName)
{
  if (object["Object Name"] != null)
     return false;
  else
     // statement B
}

if (!IsNullCheck("Object Name") && if(object["Object name"] == "Value") {
   // stuffs

} 
else 
{
        // Do Statement B
}

Or the like.

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2  
That really destroys readability and easy maintainability, if you ask me... –  Maximilian Mayerl Oct 23 '09 at 11:46
    
Not if it's reused over and over again, which was my point. Maintainability should increase drastically, as you only change code in a single place, instead of 50. –  Kyle Rozendo Oct 23 '09 at 12:32
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