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this is my homework assignment, I saw it posted on the website before, but it looks like it was unsolved and I got a different error message than a person asking that question before.

the first part of the problem is to define the subclass Worker that inherits from Employee and includes an attribute that refers to another employee who is the worker's manager. You should define a method get_manager that returns the workers' manager.

Example:

worker = Worker("Fred", 52000, myboss)

The second part of the problem is to define the subclass Executive that inherits from Employee and includes an attribute that refers to the yearly bonus.

You should override the wage method to compute executive pay based on his/her salary and bonus. You should use the wage method of Employee in the definition of the wage method for the Executive class.

Example:

executive = Executive("Kerry", 520000, 1040000)

My code is written below and the error message I get is: 'global name 'salary' is not defined' in the line 'Employee.init(self, name, salary) ' for class Executive (It works for Worker class). Why do I get that error and how can I fix it?

Thank you for your help!

class Employee(object):
    def __init__(self, name, salary):
        self._name = name
        self._salary = salary

    def my_name(self):
        return self._name

    def wage(self):
        return self._salary/26   # fortnight pay

class Worker(Employee):
    def __init__(self, name, salary, manager):
        Employee.__init__(self, name, salary)
        self._manager = manager

    def getManager(self):
        return self._manager

class Executive(Employee):
    def __init__(self, name, wage, yearlyBonus):
        Employee.__init__(self, name, salary) 
        self._yearlyBonus = yearlyBonus

    def wage(self):
        return Employee.wage(self)
share|improve this question
    
You forgot to account for the self._yearlyBonus in calculating wage for Executive –  Jared Apr 21 '13 at 7:23
    
I corrected my code, but I still get the error message 'you got a wrong wage for the executive' ... –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 7:46
    
@kate88 Is that an actual error message? And where is it coming from? Shouldn't the yearlyBonus only be applied once a year or also be divided by 26? –  Tobias Kienzler Apr 21 '13 at 7:58
1  
Thank you Tobias! I just had to divide it by 26! –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 8:26
    
Thank you everyone for help, the code is working perfectly now! –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 8:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The error is pretty clear. salary is not defined in the __init__ method of Executive.

You used wage as an argument to __init__, but salary when calling __init__ of your parent class, so you should stick to one variable name:

class Executive(Employee):
    def __init__(self, name, salary, yearlyBonus):
        Employee.__init__(self, name, salary) 

Also, you can get around typing all of those parameters in each time by using *args:

class Executive(Employee):
    def __init__(self, *args, yearlyBonus):
        super(Executive, self).__init__(*args)

Use super() instead of calling the parent class's __init__ method. It makes multiple inheritance a bit easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I corrected my code, but I still get the error message 'you got a wrong wage for the executive' ... –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 7:48
1  
@kate88: Where is that message coming from? What are you getting and what's the correct wage? –  Blender Apr 21 '13 at 7:56
1  
Its solved now, I just had to divide the yearlyBonus by 26 –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 8:29

Just look at the code where the error is occurring, and keep looking until you notice what doesn't match up:

def __init__(self, name, wage, yearlyBonus):
    Employee.__init__(self, name, salary) 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I corrected my code, but I still get the error message 'you got a wrong wage for the executive' ... –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 7:46
    
I think this second problem is due to your interpretation of the problem statement. It's not on-topic for Stack Overflow, however, as it's not a programming problem, but rather one of you understanding your assignment. –  John Zwinck Apr 21 '13 at 8:15
    
Yes, you are right, I corrected the code now and it works! –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 8:30

Yes, your init function does not have variable named salary, which gives error when you passed it in to Employee.init.

class Executive(Employee):
    def __init__(self, name, wage, yearlyBonus):
        Employee.__init__(self, name, salary) 

when you do this

executive = Executive("Kerry", 520000, 1040000)

which one correlates to the salary? passed that as the employee init method. Better if you call the Employee constructor with super

Guessing from this method

def wage(self):
        return self._salary/26   

Maybe this is what you want (not sure how to account yearlyBonus though)

 class Executive(Employee):
        def __init__(self, name, wage, yearlyBonus):
            Employee.__init__(self, name, wage * 26) 
share|improve this answer

Look at the declaration of Executive.__init__:

def __init__(self, name, wage, yearlyBonus):

Nowhere in there does it declare a variable named salary. But when you call the superclass constructor,

    Employee.__init__(self, name, salary) 

you are asking Python to pass the value of a variable named salary as the third parameter. Python is just complaining that this variable does not exist.

I imagine you can figure out how to fix it from there. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thnaks, I corrected my code, but I still get the error message 'you got a wrong wage for the executive' –  kate88 Apr 21 '13 at 7:48

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