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In the middle of a type checker for the simply-typed lambda calculus, I have this:

check Γ (lam τ′ E) (τ₁ ↣ τ₂) with τ′ T≟ τ₁
check Γ (lam τ′ E) (τ₁ ↣ τ₂) | no ¬p = no lem
  where
  lem : ¬ Γ ⊢ lam τ′ E ∷ (τ₁ ↣ τ₂)
  lem t = {!!}

The type of the hole is, of course, . I'd hope that by pattern-matching on t, I can learn enough about this type derivation to prove that it is absurd. However, if I do a case analysis on t, I get this:

lem : ¬ Γ ⊢ lam τ′ E ∷ (τ₁ ↣ τ₂)
lem (tLam t) = ?

τ′ != τ₁ of type Type
when checking that the pattern tLam t has type
Γ ⊢ lam τ′ E ∷ (τ₁ ↣ τ₂)

Yes, the very point of this is to prove that there's nothing to write in place of that t because the τs don't match... but how do I tell that to Agda?

For reference, here's the full (simplified, but complete) module:

open import Data.Nat
open import Data.Fin
open import Data.Vec
open import Function using (_∘_)

data Type : Set where
  _↣_ : Type → Type → Type

infixr 20 _↣_

open import Relation.Nullary
open import Relation.Binary.PropositionalEquality

arr-injˡ : ∀ {τ τ′ τ₂ τ₂′} → τ ↣ τ₂ ≡ τ′ ↣ τ₂′ → τ ≡ τ′
arr-injˡ refl = refl

arr-injʳ : ∀ {τ τ′ τ″} → τ ↣ τ′ ≡ τ ↣ τ″ → τ′ ≡ τ″
arr-injʳ refl = refl

_T≟_ : (τ τ′ : Type) → Dec (τ ≡ τ′)
(τ₁ ↣ τ₂) T≟ (τ₁′ ↣ τ₂′) with τ₁ T≟ τ₁′
(τ₁ ↣ τ₂) T≟ (τ₁′ ↣ τ₂′) | no ¬p = no (¬p ∘ arr-injˡ)
(τ₁ ↣ τ₂) T≟ (.τ₁ ↣ τ₂′) | yes refl with τ₂ T≟ τ₂′
(τ₁ ↣ τ₂) T≟ (.τ₁ ↣ .τ₂) | yes refl | yes refl = yes refl
(τ₁ ↣ τ₂) T≟ (.τ₁ ↣ τ₂′) | yes refl | no ¬p = no (¬p ∘ arr-injʳ)

data Expr (n : ℕ) : Set where
  lam : (τ : Type) → Expr (suc n) → Expr n

Ctxt : ℕ → Set
Ctxt = Vec Type

data _⊢_∷_ : ∀ {n} → Ctxt n → Expr n → Type → Set where
  tLam : ∀ {n} {Γ : Ctxt n} {τ E τ′} → ((τ ∷ Γ) ⊢ E ∷ τ′) → (Γ ⊢ lam τ E ∷ τ ↣ τ′)

⊢-inj : ∀ {n Γ} {E : Expr n} → ∀ {τ τ′} → Γ ⊢ E ∷ τ → Γ ⊢ E ∷ τ′ → τ ≡ τ′
⊢-inj {E = lam τ E} (tLam t) (tLam t′) = cong (_↣_ τ) (⊢-inj t t′)

module Infer where
  check : ∀ {n} Γ → (E : Expr n) → ∀ τ → Dec (Γ ⊢ E ∷ τ)
  check Γ (lam τ′ E) (τ₁ ↣ τ₂) with τ′ T≟ τ₁
  check Γ (lam τ′ E) (.τ′ ↣ τ₂) | yes refl with check (τ′ ∷ Γ) E τ₂
  check Γ (lam τ′ E) (.τ′ ↣ τ₂) | yes refl | yes E∷τ₂ = yes (tLam E∷τ₂)
  check Γ (lam τ′ E) (.τ′ ↣ τ₂) | yes refl | no ¬t = no lem
    where
    lem : ¬ Γ ⊢ lam τ′ E ∷ (τ′ ↣ τ₂)
    lem (tLam t) = ¬t t
  check Γ (lam τ′ E) (τ₁ ↣ τ₂) | no ¬p = no lem
    where
    lem : ¬ Γ ⊢ lam τ′ E ∷ (τ₁ ↣ τ₂)
    lem (tLam t) = ?
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, I'm not sure if this is the best solution, but when faced with problems like this, you usually look around the context to see where you can get and try to prove a property that leads to it.

Specially, you can't pattern match on t because, as you said, τ′ ≠ τ₁ (which is one of your assumptions). But looking at the definition of tLam, it should be possible to prove that:

lam-T≡ : ∀ {n τ₁ τ₂ τ′} {Γ : Ctxt n} {E : Expr (suc n)} →
         Γ ⊢ lam τ′ E ∷ (τ₁ ↣ τ₂) → τ′ ≡ τ₁

And indeed, this is the case:

lam-T≡ (tLam t) = refl

This gives you a proof that ¬p needs:

lem : ¬ Γ ⊢ lam τ′ E ∷ (τ₁ ↣ τ₂)
lem t = ¬p (lam-T≡ t)
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