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I have a ShellViewModel which loads a Modal Dialog. The Dialog's ViewModel has its OnActivate() override, where it gathers the data to be displayed on the Dialog. I would like to know how can we ask the WindowManager to cancel its ShowDialog based on a condition in OnActivate of the ViewModel backing the dialog.

For example, lets say that I have following code in ShellViewModel which tries to load a modal dialog based on StationOpenViewModel

public class ShellViewModel : Conductor<object>, IShell, IHandle<ConnectionChangedEvent> {
    public void ShowOpenStationPage() {
        StationOpenViewModel viewModel = container.GetExportedValue<StationOpenViewModel>();
        windowManager.ShowDialog(viewModel);
    }
    ...
}

and here is to code of OnActivate override of the StationOpenViewModel

public class StationOpenViewModel : Screen {
    ...
    protected override void OnActivate() {
        try {
            using (StationRepository stationRepository = new StationRepository()) {
            //code to get Station Data
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            //Here I have no data, so there is no point in showing the window. 
            //How to cancel showDialog() for this viewModel
        }
    ...
}

So in the above code, if I get Exception in OnActivate override, I don't have any Station data to show and I would like to cancel the showDialog() for the StationOpenViewModel. I tried using TryClose(), but if I do so, the WindowManager.ShowDialog() throws exception saying that the operation is invalid.

In summary, if I call WindowManager.ShowDialog() for a dialog backed by some ViewModel, then in that ViewModel how do I cancel the ShowDialog() operation.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The ShowDialog() implementation in CM source is:

public virtual void ShowDialog(object rootModel, object context = null, IDictionary<string, object> settings = null) 
{
    var view = EnsureWindow(rootModel, ViewLocator.LocateForModel(rootModel, null, context));
    ViewModelBinder.Bind(rootModel, view, context);

    var haveDisplayName = rootModel as IHaveDisplayName;
    if(haveDisplayName != null && !ConventionManager.HasBinding(view, ChildWindow.TitleProperty)) {
        var binding = new Binding("DisplayName") { Mode = BindingMode.TwoWay };
        view.SetBinding(ChildWindow.TitleProperty, binding);
    }

    ApplySettings(view, settings);

    new WindowConductor(rootModel, view);

    view.Show();
}

full source here:

http://caliburnmicro.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/ae25b519bf1e46a506c85395f04aaffb654c0a08#src/Caliburn.Micro.Silverlight/WindowManager.cs

It doesn't look like there is a good way to do this with the default implementation. You should probably implement your own WindowManager and subclass the original implementation

The WindowConductor in the above code file is responsible for the lifecycle of the window, therefore and additional interface which your VMs can implement would work well:

public interface ICancelActivate
{
    public bool ActivationCancelled { get };
}

Then just change your MyWindowConductor implementation to something like:

    public MyWindowConductor(object model, ChildWindow view) 
    {
            // Added this field so the window manager can query the state of activation (or use a prop if you like)
            public bool ActivationCancelled;

            this.model = model;
            this.view = view;

            var activatable = model as IActivate;
            if (activatable != null) 
            {
                activatable.Activate();
            }

            // Added code here, check to see if the activation was cancelled:
            var cancelActivate = model as ICancelActivate;
            if(cancelActivate != null)
            {
                ActivationCancelled = cancelActivate.ActivationCancelled;                   
                if(ActivationCancelled) return; // Don't bother handling the rest of activation logic if cancelled
            }

            var deactivatable = model as IDeactivate;
            if (deactivatable != null) {
                view.Closed += Closed;
                deactivatable.Deactivated += Deactivated;
            }

            var guard = model as IGuardClose;
            if (guard != null) {
                view.Closing += Closing;
            }
        }

then to stop the view from showing:

    // This is in 'ShowDialog' - you can override the default impl. as the method is marked virtual        
    ApplySettings(view, settings);

    // Get a ref to the conductor so you can check if activation was cancelled
    var conductor = new MyWindowConductor(rootModel, view);

    // Check and don't show if we don't need to
    if(!conductor.ActivationCancelled)
        view.Show();

Obviously I've just thrown this together so it might not be the best way, and I'd look carefully at where this leaves the state of your application

Your VMs just implement this:

public class StationOpenViewModel : Screen, ICancelActivation {

    private bool _activationCancelled;
    public bool ActivationCancelled { get { return _activationCancelled; } }

    ...
    protected override void OnActivate() {
        try {
            using (StationRepository stationRepository = new StationRepository()) {
            //code to get Station Data
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            _activationCancelled = true;
        }
        ... 
 }

... of course there may be better ways for you to check if you need to open a VM in the first place - I'm not sure what they would be but still, worth thinking about

Edit:

The reason I didn't just do this in the WindowManager...

    new WindowConductor(rootModel, view);

    var cancel = rootModel as ICancelActivation;

    if(cancel == null || !cancel.ActivationCancelled) // fixed the bug here!
        view.Show();

Is twofold - 1: you are still letting the WindowConductor add Deactivate and GuardClose hooks even though they should never be used, which may lead to some undesirable behaviour (not sure about reference holding either - probably ok with this once since nothing holds a ref to the conductor/VM)

2: it seems like the WindowConductor which activates the VM should be responsible for handling the cancellation of activation - ok it does mean that the WindowManager needs to know whether to show the VM or not, but it seemed a more natural fit to me

Edit 2:

One idea might be to move view.Show() into the conductor - that way you can cancel the activation without needing to expose details to the manager. Both are dependent on each other though so it's the same either way to me

share|improve this answer
    
Looks reasonable as I have many Windows to handle. Implementing WindowManager and Conductor as provided by you in your answer seems to be the fine. I still have a doubt though. Why do we need to bring Conductor in picture here? I mean why can't MyWindowManager just query the ICancelActivate from the rootModel directly and cancel the creation of dialog by itself. I mean why do we need to go through the conductor? –  Jatin Apr 22 '13 at 11:21
    
The reason I did that was that the conductor has the job of managing the window lifecycle (wiring up events etc) so you are passing off the activation of the VM to another component. The VM goes into this black box and you have no control over whether the deactivate and guardclose hooks are actually added (even though it will never be shown). It could introduce an obscure bug into your code - (not sure what, but better to be safe!) –  Charleh Apr 22 '13 at 11:27
    
I suppose the other alternative is to move view.Show() into the conductor which might tidy the implementation up a bit... it does seem that the conductor should be responsible for showing the window - it's a bit of a mix .. the manager is heavily dependent on the conductor –  Charleh Apr 22 '13 at 11:39
    
I have extended both Conductor and WindowManager and it works perfectly fine. I first tried to do with only the WindowManager, but it doesn't work simply because I can't set the ActivationCancelled of my viewModel unless the Caliburn OnActivate is called and my viewModel can decide whether to set ActivateionCancelled = true. So your solution (implementing WindowManager and Conductor) is the easiest one to implement. Thanks for the help. –  Jatin Apr 22 '13 at 11:57

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