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i was wondering why the command "showmessage" is executed before the application form appears, i mean, whenever i run the program, first appears the message, then the application form:

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
button1.hide;
button2.hide;
image3.picture.loadfromfile('c:\EAS\std.bmp');
showmessage ('Hi');
end;

end.

The first thing delphi does, it to show the message "Hi". Then it does the rest (Form appeared, hide buttons, load images etc). Even though showmessage is last, it is executed first. How do i make the message appear after the form is appeared, the buttons are hiden are the image is loaded?

Thanks

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1 Answer

The reason is that the form is created (hence, OnCreate is fired), before it is shown.

Solution 1

One solution is to post a window message to the form when the form is created. Try this:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs;

const
  WM_GREETING = WM_USER + 1;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
  private
  protected
    procedure WMGreeting(var Message: TMessage); message WM_GREETING;
  public
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  PostMessage(Self.Handle, WM_GREETING, 0, 0);
end;

procedure TForm1.WMGreeting(var Message: TMessage);
begin
  ShowMessage('Created and shown!');
end;

end.

Solution 2

A different solution is to make use of the OnActivate event, which is called every time the form obtains keyboard focus: Add a private field FMessageShown: boolean to the form class. Then, in OnActivate, if the flag is false (as it is by default, being a field of a class), then display your message and set the flag to true:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    procedure FormActivate(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
    FMessageShown: boolean;
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.FormActivate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if not FMessageShown then
  begin
    ShowMessage('Created and shown.');
    FMessageShown := true;
  end;
end;

end.

In practice, both methods work perfectly. The downside of the first solution is that it may rely somewhat on 'implementation details', while the downside of the latter one is quite obvious: you check a flag every time the form regets keyboard focus, even weeks after the form was initially created and the message was shown.

Solution 3

A solution that has neither disadvantage, but assumes that you won't need the OnActivate event for some other purpouse, is simply to 'unassign' the event after its first (hence, only) execution:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs;

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    procedure FormActivate(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm1.FormActivate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  ShowMessage('Created and shown.');
  OnActivate := nil;
end;

end.

(This approach, however, can be extended to cases where you do need the event for other purpouses too, if you replace OnActivate := nil by OnActivate := MySecondEventHandler.)

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1  
I would rather post a message to itself from the OnShow event. –  TLama Apr 21 '13 at 13:42
    
@TLama: But if the form is hidden and then shown again, the message will appear once more. But probably you can post the message in OnCreate. Make an answer! –  Andreas Rejbrand Apr 21 '13 at 13:43
    
@TLama: I just tried it, and it works perfectly! –  Andreas Rejbrand Apr 21 '13 at 13:51
1  
The point is that you don't need to rely on asynchronous message dispatch. The goal is to do something when the window appears on screen. Since the systems notifies you of that, it is, in my view, better to respond to that. –  David Heffernan Apr 21 '13 at 13:59
1  
So guys, After a very long discussion that you made :P, which one is the best way to do this? –  user2296565 Apr 21 '13 at 16:06
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