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I have an elliptical particles system and I am trying to calculate the angle between the major axis of each particle and the vector of the distance from the center of the next particle. This picture should illustrate nicely, I hope. Elliptical particles vector angle

In this example I initialize two particles at (0,0) and (10,-10). The angle of each particle relative to the Cartesian system is 45 degrees. So these 2 are parallel to each other. I want to calculate the angles that I have marked as 90 degree angles in the picture.

For this, I have made this function, using the dot product:

    double temp = 0;
    double result = 0;
    double cosPhi = 0;
    double dotProd = 0;
    double cosTheta = cos(current->getTheta());
    //  If Theta = PI/2, there is a tiny difference between this rounded value
    // and the exact value of PI/2 due to double precision representation. This
    // gives cos(PI/2) = 6*10^-17 instead of 0. So, manually set cos(PI/2) = 0.
    if(almostEqual(cosTheta,0))
        cosTheta = 0;
    double cellLengthX = current->getLength()*cosTheta;
    double cellLengthY = current->getLength()*sin(current->getTheta());
    double dist = Distance(current, next);
    if(dist == 0)
        return 0.0;
    //cout << "Dist " << dist << endl;
    // calculate the vector of distance 
    // next - current, because the end of the vector is the next cell,
    // while the start of the vector is the current cell.
    double distX = next->getCurrX() - current->getCurrX();
    double distY = next->getCurrY() - current->getCurrY();
    //cout <<"DistX " << distX <<" DistY " << distY << endl;
    // Dot product
    dotProd = cellLengthX*distX + cellLengthY*distY;
    //cout << "DotP " << dotProd << endl; 
    // angle from formula : vector_a*vector_b = |a||b|cos(phi)
    cosPhi = dotProd/(current->getLength()*dist);
    cout << "aCos " << acos(cosPhi) << endl;
    if(cosPhi == 1) // 0 degrees
    {
        return 0;
    }
    else if(cosPhi == -1) // 180 degrees 
    {
        return M_PI;
    }
    else if(cosPhi == 0) // 90 or 270 degrees
    {
        if(distX>0 || distY>0)
            return M_PI_2; // 90
        else
            return 3*M_PI_2; // 270
    }
    else if(-distX<=0 && -distY <0) // 1st quadrant -distX<=0
    {
        //cout << "Angle 1st :" << acos(cosPhi) << endl;
        return acos(cosPhi);
    }
    else if(-distX>=0 && -distY >0) // 3rd quadrant    -distX>=0
    {
        temp = acos(cosPhi);
        result = M_PI_2 + temp;
        //cout << "Angle 3rd :" << result << endl;
        return result;
    }
    else if(-distX >0 && -distY <=0) // 2nd quadrant  -distY <=0
    {
        //cout << "Angle 2nd :" << acos(cosPhi) << endl;
        return acos(cosPhi);
    }
    else if(-distX <0 && -distY >=0) // 4th quadrant    -distY >=0
    {
        temp = acos(cosPhi);
        result = 3*M_PI_2 + temp;
        //cout << "Angle 4th :" << result << endl;
        return result;
    } 

This method worked in principle, but there is something wrong when I judge in which quadrant to assign the return of acos(cosPhi). As I have read from others on SO (and found out myself) there is a problem with acos because you don't know in which quadrant to assign the final angle.

So I made a method using atan2(y,x):

    double x1, y1, x2, y2, phi1, phi2, theta, omega;
    omega = 0;
    theta = current->getTheta();
    phi1 = 0;
    phi2 = 0;
    x1 = current->getLength()*cos(theta);
    y1 = current->getLength()*sin(theta);
    x2 = next->getCurrX() - current->getCurrX();
    y2 = next->getCurrY() - current->getCurrY();
    //phi1 = atan2(y1,x1);
    //phi2 = atan2(y2,x2);
    omega = atan2(y2-y1,x2-x1);//phi2 - phi1;
    cout << phi1 << "   " << phi2 <<  "   " << omega << endl;
    return omega;

But what I get back is -90 degrees for the first particle (I guess it's OK) and -180 degrees for the second particle which is not OK. Any help would be really appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Did you consider vector product instead of crossproduct? $|a x b|=|a||b|sin(theta)$ – Bernhard Apr 21 '13 at 13:53
    
You say you want "the angle between the major axis of each particle and the vector of the distance from the center of the next particle", but in your example, there is no next particle for the second particle. – Vaughn Cato Apr 21 '13 at 14:01
    
I am calculating the dot product: vector_a*vector_b = |a||b|cos(phi), not the cross product. But yeah, maybe I can try the cross product. – Dima1982 Apr 21 '13 at 14:03
    
@VaughCato : The next particle for particle 2 is particle 1. Sorry, I should have mentioned that! – Dima1982 Apr 21 '13 at 14:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's hard to be sure, based on your description, but... Try this:

double x2, y2, theta, omega;

theta = current->getTheta();

x2 = next->getCurrX() - current->getCurrX();
y2 = next->getCurrY() - current->getCurrY();

omega = atan2(y2,x2) - theta;
cout << omega << endl;
return omega;
share|improve this answer
    
You were correct! So, what this basically does is to find the absolute angle (according to Cartesian (0,0)) of vector d (in the pic) and and then subtracts the angle of the current particle?? I'm sorry if I didn't make it very clear. You cannot imagine how happy you made a fellow human today! :) Thank you! – Dima1982 Apr 21 '13 at 19:51

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