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I use this to build my spring mvc app:

mvn clean package

I use the maven war plugin to create a war file, but the problem I am facing is that in my resources folder I have my development versions of my .properties files for log4j etc.

When I push to production, and run:

java -jar ...

It explodeds the war file, and then at that point I can modify the .properties files with my production settings, but I obviously want to do this during my maven build for production.

Is there a way I can tell maven that this is a production build, so get these files from somewhere else? And during development, keep doing what it is doing now?

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1  
It seems you're referring to maven profiles. –  Andrew Logvinov Apr 21 '13 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

User maven profiles. Maven profiles help you in specifying different properties for different profiles. So you can have two profiles - development and production.

Something like this -

 <profiles>
  <profile>
    <id>development</id>
    <!-- we'll properties here... -->
  </profile>
  <profile>
    <id>production</id>
    <!-- ...and here -->
  </profile>
</profiles>

Like this example -

<profile>
  <id>development</id>
  <properties>
    <db.driverClass>oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver</db.driverClass>
    <db.connectionURL>jdbc:oracle:thin:@127.0.0.1:1521:XE</db.connectionURL>
  </properties>
</profile>
<profile>
  <id>production</id>
  <properties>
    <db.driverClass>oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver</db.driverClass>
    <db.connectionURL>jdbc:oracle:thin:@134.0.0.1:3124:XE</db.connectionURL>
  </properties>
</profile>
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There are a couple of options here. The first (as others have mentioned as well) is to use maven profiles. Instead of having multiple version of your properties files, you would have something like:

mypropsfile.properties
-----------------------
prop1=${prop1.val}
prop2=${prop2.val}

Then in your profiles, you can define values for those properties (make sure you have resource filtering enabled for this to work. see an example http://www.manydesigns.com/en/portofino/portofino3/tutorials/using-maven-profiles-and-resource-filtering).

You can also have your properties file have production values in it but with the ability to override those files in development. Spring profiles are helpful for this. For example, in development mode you can look for a properties file named <user-home>/mypropertiesoverride.properties, which could be used to override any of the production value properties with development specific ones.

I prefer the second method here where you have a default properties file and then you can just override select properties.

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It isn't restricted to just .properties files, I also have json based config files. –  Blankman Apr 21 '13 at 14:49
    
I was just using properties an as example here. It can be any type of resource file. –  Jeff Storey Apr 21 '13 at 14:50
    
using profiles is just like writing two different independent pom files. If you can do something using two different poms, then you can achieve same using profiles... –  popeye Apr 21 '13 at 14:58
    
thanks, could I also do this, somehow remove all config/property files during a production war build, and then in deployment I could add those files during my deployment to a folder, and then add that folder to my classpath? –  Blankman Apr 21 '13 at 23:27
    
While I'm not sure exactly the problem you're facing with some of the suggestions in the answers, that particular ideas sounds a bit over complicated... –  Jeff Storey Apr 21 '13 at 23:29

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